Providing Learning Support for Blind or Visually Impaired Students Undertaking Fieldwork and Related Activities

Resources

Internet resources

Ability Net, www.abilitynet.org.uk.

This charity provides a major set of resources on all aspects of disability, through its Web site, its helpline, home visits and training courses. Particularly strong on visual disability and 'get around' technology for computers, for which it has produced a number of detailed technical factsheets.

A Blind Net, www.blind.net.

A guide to resources for the blind.

Blindness Resource Center, www.nyise.org/blind.htm.

Information and guidance for the blind from the New York Institute for Special Education. (Good example of a Web site available in several formats: graphics, text-only, large print, and frames.)

Blind Mobility Research Unit (BMRU).

Based at the University of Nottingham; now defunct.

British Computer Society Disability Group, www1.bcs.org.uk/homepages/361/.

Undertakes a range of activities aimed at giving disabled people a better quality of life, especially in relation to the use of IT.

National Clearinghouse on Education and Training for People with Disabilities (NCET), www.deakin.edu.au/tedca/ncet/.

An Australian Web site launched in September 2000 as a centralised source of information on tertiary education and training opportunities for people with disabilities.

NLBUK (2000) National Library for the Blind, www.nlb-online.org.

A UK gateway to library services for visually impaired people.

Oedipus (2000) Blindness-related Resources on the Web and Beyond, www.hicom.net/~oedipus/blind.html.

An extensive collection of links to international sources on the Web.

Scottish Sensory Centre, www.ssc.mhie.ac.uk/.

Promotes and supports new developments and effective practices in the education of children and young people with sensory impairments. Provides an excellent summary of the characteristics of a wide range of visual impairments, and makes recommendations on how best to use video with VI students.

Blindness and Visual Impairment Ring, http://j.webring.com/hub?ring=bvi.

A Web 'ring' (connected set of thematic Web sites) relevant to the blindness and visual impairment. Over 260 sites were listed at the end of 2000.

VIG (2000) V. I. Guide: a guide to Internet resources about visual impairments, for parents and teachers, www.viguide.com.

A structured guide to resources on the Web for the blind, with an educational slant.

Web links

Here are some Web sites which provide extensive sets of links to sites dealing with various aspects of blindness and visual impairment:

Adaptive Technology: http://www.seidata.com/~marriage/rbadapt.html.

Resource Sites on Blindness: http://www.nyise.org/blindness.htm.

Disabled People's Association (Singapore) Websites: Blind and Visually Handicapped: http://www.dpa.org.sg/VH/welcome.html.

Other resources

Disability Rights Commission (DRC): www.drc-gb.org.

Set up to police the working of the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995; comes into force in April 2000.

RNIB (Royal National Institute for the Blind): www.rnib.org.uk.

The main UK organisation representing the needs and interests of blind and visually impaired people. Provides a wide range of information and advice, and lobbies on behalf of the community it represents.

Sensory Disabilities Research Unit (SDRU): www.psy.herts.ac.uk/sdru/.

This Research Unit is no longer active. All pages remaining here are for archive purposes only.

National Centre for Tactile Diagrams (NCTD): http://www.nctd.org.uk/.

Based at the University of Hertfordshire, this provides a subsidised tactile diagram production service for further and higher education. It also holds open days, runs training courses, provides consultancy to organisations, and is developing an archive of tactile diagrams.

The Disability Information and Resource Centre, South Australia: www.dircsa.org.au.

Provides useful information on topics ranging from legislation and travel rights to fact sheets and resource links.

Special tutorials and keyboard guides are available to help people learn to use general Windows applications programs from Project ASSIST at the Iowa Department for the Blind (www.blind.state.ia.us/assist/).

Page updated 5 June 2003

GDN pages maintained by Phil Gravestock