International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education Abstracts

1994

Jones, A.I. (1994) Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 45-67.
van Dijk, H, van der Schee, J, Trimp, H & van der Zipp, T. (1994) Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 68-80
Robertson, M.E. (1994) Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 3-21.
Verhetsel, A. (1994) Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 45-55.


Jones, A.I. (1994), Structuralism revisited: an examination of the continuing influence of structuralism on research and education in human geography
International Research in Geographical
and Environmental Education, Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 45-67

ABSTRACT:

In the past two decades, structuralism in geographical research and education has passed from central attraction to acceptable functional ingredient. Its inspiration continues, but its internal structure and epistemological operation and implications remain less clearly defined and less adequately exploited than those of humanism and positivism. As the initial indicator of the emergence of epistemological pluralism in human geography, structuralism invites continuing analysis of its role in the development of geographical explanation. Understanding structuralism appears to be vital to comprehension of the methodological discussion now embracing structuration, realism, and post-modernism, and thus of particular interest to those teaching geographical thought and practice.

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van Dijk, H, van der Schee, J, Trimp, H & van der Zipp, T. (1994), Map skills and Geographical Knowledge.
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 68-80

ABSTRACT:

Education proves more efficient when students acquire procedural knowledge in addition to declarative knowledge. Procedural knowledge offers opportunities for more and different kinds of achievement, because this kind of knowledge is more flexible than declarative knowledge. Geographers at the Free University in Amsterdam have developed a geography programme that systematically trains students in declarative as well as procedural knowledge. Map skills play an important role in geographical procedural knowledge. This paper reports on a study which investigates the ability of students in the first year of secondary education to use different types of map skills.

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Robertson, M.E. (1994), The influence of place on adolescents' responses to environmental stimuli
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 3-21

ABSTRACT:

In this paper a description is given of the first of two studies concerned with the influence of the place where one lives on thinking processes and approaches to study. Place is defined as the product of the totality of interactions between people and their place of residence. Previous studies have indicated possible connections between place and language, concept knowledge, attitudes towards environmental stimuli, study approaches, and leisure and recreation pursuits. Generally, however, the focus has been on one sample selected from the same place with little evidence of comparative data with neighbouring places. In such circumstances the data could be attributed to development rather than everyday experiences in one's environment. In this study a construct validation process was used to support the hypothesised link between adolescents thinking and their longterm place of residence. Samples selected from four contrasting places confirmed the possibility of place specific thinking.

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Verhetsel, A. (1994), The world in our heads: An experimental tuition programme focusing on students' ability to represent and structure spatially
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 45-55

ABSTRACT:

In many everyday situations, we are confronted with spatial problems such as when we try to find the way to a new shop or a friend's new house or when we try to find an alternative route to avoid traffic jams in the city. We are also living in an age of rapid and abundant diffusion of information from all over the world, although we are only rarely conscious of this. Despite this plethora of information, many of us have only a hazy knowledge of geography. This article focuses on the design, the organisation and the conclusions of an experimental tuition programme in "spatial thought". When 12-year-old children gain insight into basic spatial concepts such as the ability to manipulate scale, perspective, orientation and symbols, they are able to construct mental spatial representations (cognitive maps) which allow them to find good solutions to spatial problems.

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