International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education Abstracts

1996

Andrew, J., Jickling, B. & Robottom, I. (1996) Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 31-44.
Jennings, S.A. (1996) Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 45-54.
Chi-kin Lee, J. (1996) Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 154-171.


Andrew, J.1, Jickling, B.2 & Robottom, I.3 (1996), Ethics, Education and Wildlife Issues
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 31-44

1Centre for Studies in Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education, Deakin University, Victoria 3217, Australia
2Yukon College, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
3Centre for Studies in Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education, Deakin University, Victoria 3217, Australia

ABSTRACT:

Many agencies have given attention to ethical dimensions of wildlife management issues. Important questions remain about the nature of ethics, and how they can be interpreted. This paper explores two different conceptions of 'ethics' and suggests a framework for exploring ethical dimensions of environmental issues. This framework is applied in the examination of two case studies of wildlife management issues-one from Canada and one from Australia. The paper concludes with a consideration of implications for practice, research and education, arguing that a consideration of ethics can itself serve an educative function.

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Jennings, S.A. (1996), An Evaluation of the Influence of Travel on the Geographic Knowledge of College Students
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 45-54

Department of Geography, Texas A&M University. College Station TX77843-3147, USA

ABSTRACT:

Students on a ship travelling to international ports were asked to write about their perceptions of the ports of call before and after visiting the ports. These responses were analysed in order to determine how the geographic knowledge of these student changed after visiting the ports. There were changes in the number of key words and the complexity of those key words after a visit. This indicates that the students developed a more detailed knowledge of these foreign ports. The detailed knowledge is more specific to individual experiences rather than the broader geographic concepts that a teacher is hoping to teach in the classroom. This study suggests that these very specific examples can be used in class to whet the interest of students and to illustrate the broader geographic concepts.

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Chi-kin Lee, J. (1996), A Study of Environmental Attitudes and Concepts of Geography Student-teachers: Implications for Teacher Education
International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
, Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 154-171

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Faculty of Education The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin New Territories. Hong Kong

ABSTRACT:

This small-scale study explores the environmental attitudes and concepts of environment and environmental education of geography student-teachers. A combination of questionnaire survey and interviews was used. The survey findings showed that the geography student-teachers had relatively high levels of environmental concern and verbal commitment towards environmental issues but had relatively low levels of actual commitment concerning environmental matters. The results emerging from the second part of this study suggest that geography student-teachers may have some commonalities in their conceptions of the environment and environmental education. The implications of these results for teacher education are discussed.

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