JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 1992

Cohen, S.B. (1992) 91(1), pp.2-10.
Hammen III, J.L. (1992) 91(1), pp.28-31.
Hay, I. (1992) 91(1), pp.32-36.
Walsh, S.J. (1992) 91(2), pp.54-61
Wije, C. (1992) 91(2), pp.68-72
Pape, B. & Francek, M.A. (1992) 91(2), pp.73-75
Jumper, S. (1992) 91(3), pp.94-96
Dunn, J.M. (1992) 91(3), pp.97-105.
Henderson, M.L. (1992) 91(3), pp.113-118
Cross, J.A. (1992) 91(5),pp.190-199.
Elbow, G.S. (1992) 91(5), pp.200-204
Horst, O.H. (1992) 91(5), pp.205-210
Meyer-Arnold, K.J., Sambrook, R.A. & Kermath, B.M. (1992) 91(5), pp.219-225.


Cohen, S.B. (1992) Middle East Geopolitical Transformation: The Disappearance of a Shatterbelt. Journal of Geography, 91(1), pp.2-10.

ABSTRACT:

The cold war's end has brought about major global geopolitical restructuring. It also is cause for regional geopolitical reordering. The gulf war and its aftermath are but one expression of Middle Eastern disequilibrium. This shatterbelt region has been caught up in both intraregional tensions and the post-World War II history of competition between the Maritime and Eurasian Continental realms. Now the Middle East is becoming strategically reoriented to the West. While powerful centrifugal forces still prevail, the reduction of external competitive pressures permits centripetal forces to become more salient. In addition to Arabismand Islam, these include migration and capital flows and water and oil transportation lines. A new balance among the Middle East's six regional powers can be fostered but not dictated by the outside world. Equilibrium can best be promoted, not by a Pax Americana, but by the United States and the European Community acting as two competitive but allied stabilizers.

Key words: capitalflows, geopolitical equilibrium, Gulf War, migration, oil pipelines, shatterbelt.

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Hammen III, J.L. (1992) Accommodating Student Diversity in Remote Sensing Instruction. Journal of Geography, 91(1), pp.28-31.

ABSTRACT:

Instruction in remote sensing has long been an important part of the curricula in many geography departments. A wide range of students, from various academic disciplines, routinely participate in course offerings. The diversity of technical backgrounds in this student body exacerbates the problem of providing effective instruction, especially in courses requiring the use of computers and in departments with limited resources. Teaching to the "lowest common denominator" (i.e., those with minimal or no computer backgrounds) runs the risk of alienating those with greater expertise. Conversely, gearing instructional materials and focus toward more technically sophisticated students may frustrate others. This paper highlights a curricular approach for remote sensing instruction which accommodates all levels of technical expertise through the use of inexpensive microcomputer-based technology.

Key words: remote sensing, computer skills, microcomputers, disciplinary diversity. .

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Hay, I. (1992) Choice and Constraint in the Location of Urban Retail Activities. Journal of Geography, 91(1), pp.32-36.

ABSTRACT:

Instructors and students often find it difficult to cope with philosophical and methodological issues in geography classes. In part, this stems from an inability to connect abstract issues with students' personal experiences. In an effort to overcome such difficulties, the classroom exercise presented in this paper requires students to prepare, undertake, and analyze an interactive interview. The exercise leads students to explore both retail location decision making and the use of an intensive research strategy. On the basis of this exercise, stimulating classroom discussions on philosophy and methodology can be initiated.

Key words: locational decision making, intensive research, interactive interviews, voluntarism, determinism.

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Walsh, S.J. (1992), Spatial Education and Integrated Hands-on Training: Essential Foundations of GIS Instruction, Journal of Geography, 91(2), pp.54-61.

ABSTRACT:

Instructional approaches in the spatial sciences of geographic information systems, remote sensing, and computer cartography are becoming more integrated because of their redundant requirements in theoretical education and hands-on training. A common set of conceptual issues and topical priorities was established for a newly developed course, "Spatial Data Representation and Display. " The course is organized under the major headings of data acquisition, data encoding and storage, data display, and data analysis, and encompasses issues that serve as spatial foundations for the more advanced GIS, remote sensing, and computer cartography courses. Hands-on experiences in satellite image processing, GIS analysis, and data output are conducted on laboratory facilities developed or adapted for instructional student opportunities. Hardware configurations and software systems used to accommodate the spatial training are presented, as well as the theoretical issues and topical areas covered through the course design.

Keywords: spatial education and training, curricula for spatial foundations course, hardware configurations and software alternatives.

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Wije, C, (1992) A Water "Atlas" Exercise with Conservation Students, Journal of Geography, 91(2), pp.68-72.

ABSTRACT:

Constructing a proto state water "atlas" is a valuable teaching aid in college-level conservation courses, especially when students come with a limited prior exposure to geography. A water atlas that graphically depicts the human-physical interface of the hydrologic cycle permits an integrative view of resource conservation and management.

Key words: resource conservation, educational tool, water atlas.

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Pape, B. & Francek, M.A. (1992) Central Michigan University's Glacial Park: Instruction Through Landscaping. Journal of Geography, 91(2), pp.73-75.

ABSTRACT:

Concern for a better student understanding of glacial landforms prompted the idea of a model glacial landscape. A site plan depicting common continental glacial features such as moraines, drumlins, and eskers was developed. The plan became a reality with fill from a local road construction project. Student learning is maximized through a prepared series of interpretive questions relating to the model landscape. The glacial park has proven to be an effective outdoor laboratory with applicability to other campuses at all grade levels. At a minimum, a dump truck load of fill has the potential to turn an isolated campus corner into a micro scale glacialscape.

Key words: glacial landforms, field trip, moraine, drumlin, eskers, glacial process.

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Jumper, S. (1992) Program Assessment in Geography: Boondoggle or Opportunity. Journal of Geography, 91(3), pp.94-96.

ABSTRACT:

Holding universities accountable for the quality of their products (students), and how to assess relative product quality, have become major concerns of many academic units. The position taken in this paper is that the assessment process should be approached in a positive frame of mind, and that it should encourage development of meaningful curricular goals and strategies for their implementation. This approach will result in programs of improved quality that will attract superior students and enhance the standing of geography in the academic community.

Key words: assessment, accountability, performance funding, proficiency examination, goals.

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Dunn, J.M. (1992) Translation and Development Theory in Geographic Education: A Model for the Genesis and Production of Geography Instructional Materials in a Competitive Funded Grant Environment. Journal of Geography, 91(3), pp.97-105.

ABSTRACT:

Geographic educators strive to improve the quality of instructional materials. Understanding the process of creating materials is key in that endeavor. The process combines translation, the conversion of the languages of geography and education for the student, and development, a packaging process that considers geography, education, and the adoption environment. Good materials require careful planning, management, and knowledge of geography and educational theory. All of those requirements, however, are rarely possessed by geographers. Building theory addresses that shortage. A preliminary model, constructed from analyses of competitive funded grant projects, begins an explanation of translation and development in geography. It begins with a problem that is solved by new materials. Geographers seek input, develop objectives, and choose an approach to explanation with a medium for delivery. Necessary staff and communication complete the elements for funding proposals, followed by production, testing, revision, and publication. Projects typically end with a reflective final report.

Key words: instructional materials, geography, model, translation, development.

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Henderson, M.L.(1992) Cultural Diversity in Geography Curriculum: The Geography of American Indians. Journal of Geography, 91(3), pp.113-118.

ABSTRACT:

This paper discusses the role of geography curriculum in teaching cultural diversity by examining the course content in one course taught at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. The course, The Geography of American Indians in the United States and Canada, included lectures, student projects, outside activities, and an evaluation of learning. Course content is identified and three lectures based on Great Lakes Chippewa geography are summarized. Evaluation of learning indicates students improved geographical skills, increased their knowledge of spatial and ecological characteristics of American Indian culture groups, and became familiar with historical and legal parameters of resources use conflicts between local Great Lakes Chippewa and non-Indians in northern Wisconsin.

Key words: multicultural education, American Indians, Indian policies, Great Lakes Chippewa, treaty rights, resource use conflict.

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Cross, J.A. (1992) Natural Hazards within the West Indies. Journal of Geography, 91(5), pp.190-199.

ABSTRACT:

Earthquakes, volcanoes, and hurricanes, together with high population densities and poverty, make the West Indies one of the most vulnerable areas to natural hazards in the world. This paper summarizes the effects and consequences of historic natural disasters within the region and reviews the causes and distribution of these three natural hazards. Suggestions are provided for teachers wishing to utilize information about Columbus or Caribbean geography to introduce their students to a wide array of geographic concepts and questions in physical, environmental, historical, and social geography.

Key words: natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, West Indies, Caribbean.

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Elbow, G.S. (1992) Migration or Interaction: Reinterpreting Pre-Columbian West Indian Culture Origins. Journal of Geography, 91(5), pp.200-204.

ABSTRACT:

The standard model for explaining the settlement of the West Indies in pre-Columbian times is based on a series of migrations from South America that account for the origins of Ciboney, Taino, and Island Carib ethnic groups. Recent work in linguistics and archaeology have led to the development of a new model. According to this model, the Ciboney may have descended from the earliest inhabitants of the West Indies, who were probably migrants from Yucatan or Central America to the Greater Antilles, while Taino and Island Caribs represent separate branches from a single migration wave of Arawak speakers that moved northward from South America. Changing models of West Indian culture history provide a useful framework for discussing the processes of culture change and for introducing information on use of scientific analysis in the social sciences.

Key words: WestIndies, Taino, Island Carib, Ciboney, Arawak, culture origins, migration, pre-history.

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Horst, O.H. (1992) Climate and the "Encounter" in the Dominican Republic. Journal of Geography,91(5), pp.205-210.

ABSTRACT:

The impact of weather and climate upon societies is manifold in character, having altered the course of historic events as well as conditioned the nature of human activity. This may be amply demonstrated in the Caribbean island nation of the Dominican Republic during the period of its formation following the initial arrival of Europeans. For instructional purposes, this subject may be best approached by first reviewing the character of elements of weather and climate that prevail in the Dominican Republic followed by a consideration of the way in which these impacted upon those involved in exploration and settlement of that region of the Caribbean. Finally, a choice of instructional strategies is presented by means of which the interaction between weather and climate and cultural activity may by illustrated.

Key words: climate, rainfall, hurricanes, Trade winds, Columbus, Caribbean, Dominican Republic.

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Meyer-Arnold, K.J., Sambrook, R.A. & Kermath, B.M. (1992) Seaside Resorts in the Dominican Republic: A Typology. Journal of Geography, 91(5), pp.219-225.

ABSTRACT:

Since the early 1970s, the growing attraction of beaches has led to a proliferation of seaside resorts along the Atlantic and Caribbean shores of the Dominican Republic. The distribution of beach resorts reflects a combination of quality and quantity of natural resources, proximity of urban centers and/or airports, and intensity of development efforts exerted by private entrepreneurs and/or government agencies. Both domestic and international tourism are responsible for beachfront urbanization in the Dominican Republic. At least five discrete types of coastal resorts may be identified: 1) the urban balneario, 2) the domestic destination resort, 3) the "integrated" domestic/international destination resort, 4) the "interactive" enclave resort, and 5) the "self-contained" enclave resort. Each of these resort types is characterized by a particular tourist clientele and a distinctive urban morphologic pattern. Although overlap between types may occasionally blur the distinctions, this typology is presented to better understand evolving touristic landscapes.

Key words: tourism, resorts, coast, Caribbean, Dominican Republic.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
Page created 8th December 1999.
Last updated 11th May 2000.