JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 1994

Boehm, R.G., Brierley, J. & Sharma, M. (1994) 93(1), pp.21-25.
Frazier, J.W. (1994) 93(1), pp.29-35.
Nellis, M.D. (1994) 93(1), pp.36-39.
McKeown-Ice, R. (1994) 93(1), pp.40-42.
Downs, R.M. (1994) 93(1), pp.57-60.
Wilvert, C. (1994) 93(2), pp.74-79.
Sutherland, R. (1994) 93(2), pp.80-95.
Knapp, P.A. & Thompson, J.M. (1994) 93(2), pp.96-100.
Masilela, C.O. (1994) 93(3), pp.114-121.
Brown, B.J. (1994) 93(3), pp.132-135.
Butler, D.R. (1994) 93(3), pp.141-151.
Havill, T., Jobin, R.A., Maguire, B. & Miller, T. (1994) 93(3), pp.164-170.



Boehm, R.G., Brierley, J. & Sharma, M. (1994) The Bete Noir of GeographicEducation: Teacher Training Programs. Journal of Geography, 93(1), pp.21-25.

ABSTRACT:

Despite many recent successes, the geographic education community faces serious problems based on its failure to create and maintain strategies for effective preservice teacher education. The development of effective preservice training is hindered by many problems, including the differing position of geography in school curricula among the states, lack of effective communication among groups responsible for curricula and teacher training, and poor interaction between universities and the schools. One remedy for this situation is cooperation and mutual respect. Preservice teacher education programs in geography need to be cast into a framework fashioned by a broad representation of those who have a stake in quality education-teachers, school district officials, bureaucrats, non-geographers and geographic educators.

Key words: preservice, curriculum, teacher certification, school of education.

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Frazier, J.W. (1994) Geography in the Workplace: A Personal Assessment with a Look to the Future. Journal of Geography, 93(1), pp.29-35.

ABSTRACT:

This paper offers a perspective of geography in the workplace. Who is doing what kind of geography can help us understand the impacts of our discipline in the workplace. We can and must do better in providing research oriented, problem solvers to the workplace. To achieve this, we need to address collegiate-level geographic education, our goals and aspirations, the discipline's roles and responsibilities, educational reforms, and potential linkages between academic geography and the public and private sectors. If we understand geographers' roles in the workplace today, and can agree on the needs for tomorrow, we can debate goals, actions, and outcomes. While no one knows the entire workplace, its opportunities, and demands, I provide a general model of geographers in the workplace, including "who is" and "who is likely to be applying geography in the future." This leads to how our degree recipients should be educated and suggests issues, challenges, and strategies.

Keywords: Applied geography, careers, private sector.

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Nellis, M.D. (1994) Technology in Geographic Education: Reflections and Future Directions. Journal of Geography, 93(1), pp.36-39.

ABSTRACT:

Enhancing geographic education must include the integration of spatial technologies. With the wealth of information and the integration of information associated with geography, technology is a natural link to maximize our ability to understand spatial processes and with that to think geographically. Through telecommunication, computer graphics, geography computer programs and simulations, as well as GIS, GPS, and remote sensing, geography educators and students can address a broader range of spatial questions than was previously possible. Future directions require the development of exemplary curriculum materials, a greater network of technology users coordinated through the Geographic Alliances, private and federal cooperation for diffusion of software and hardware to geography teachers, and standardized efforts relative to ethics in information.

Key words: .spatial technologies, geographic information system, remote sensing, GPS, exemplary curriculum materials.

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McKeown-Ice, R. (1994) Environmental Education: A Geographical Perspective. Journal of Geography, 93(1), pp.40-42.

ABSTRACT:

Geography is an ideal disciplinary vehicle for environmental education; however, non-geographers are rarely aware of the vast geographic interest, research, and literature related to the environment. Geographers study the environment in four major ways: 1) the natural environment using scientific methods and techniques; 2) the impact of human behavior on the environment; 3) environmental influences on human behavior; and 4) the different cultural perceptions of the environment and how these perceptions are expressed in the surrounding landscape. Within these avenues of inquiry, geographers examine spatial patterns of environmentally related topics at different scales-local, regional, and global-and the interconnections of the global environment and economy. The future role of geography in environmental education is shaped by four current activities: the development of science and geography standards and assessment frameworks, the formulation of environmental literacy standards, and the creation of environmental education certification standards.

Key words: geographic education,. environmental literacy standards, environmental education.

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Downs, R.M. (1994) The Need for Research in Geography Education: It Would be Nice to Have Some Data. Journal of Geography, 93(1), pp.57-60.

ABSTRACT:

The field of geography education is sadly lacking in empirical data that might inform and underpin decisions about standard setting, curriculum design, materials development, teaching strategies, and assessment procedures. Large quantities of high-quality data are necessary if geography is to be successfully implemented in the American education system. This article advances four needs that, if met, would generate the data necessary to make the case for geography in America's schools. We need a new attitude towards research, a series of baseline studies, a research agenda, and a research clearinghouse if we are to make a convincing case for geography in America's schools.

Key words: research agenda. baseline data, clearinghouse

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Wilvert, C. (1994) Spain: Europe's California. Journal of Geography, 93(2), pp.74-79.

ABSTRACT:

As Spain integrates into the European Community, it is increasingly thought of as Europe's California. Making regional comparisons can be an effective teaching method. There are obvious climatic parallels between Spain and California. During recent decades, the Mediterranean coast of Spain has been transformed by tourism. Irrigation has also transformed that coast and various interior areas, resulting in high-yield agriculture. In California, too, tourism and irrigated agriculture are of major importance. However, in Spain there is a much greater use of plastic sheeting. A unique example is 55 square miles of plastic covered greenhouses erected over man-made, water-conserving sand beds along the southeast coast.

Keywords: Spain, Mediterranean coast, European Community, California, tourism, agriculture, greenhouse, sand beds.

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Sutherland, R. (1994) Teaching the Hydrologic and Geomorphic Significance of Drainage Basins and Discharge in Physical Geography. Journal of Geography, 93(2), pp.80-95.

ABSTRACT:

Drainage basins, stream discharge, and sediment discharge are fundamental concepts in physical geography, and they play an integral part in other cognate disciplines. To enhance student understanding of water and sediment discharge there needs to be an integration of field-based monitoring exercises with classroom exercises using readily available (published) discharge data from water resource agencies. This paper outlines two groups of exercises. The first set of exercises involves a combination of field-based monitoring and associated laboratory analysis, and they include the following worked examples for Manoa Stream, Oahu, Hawaii: I ) discharge measurement using the velocity-area technique, 2) measurement of suspended sediment concentration, and computation of suspended sediment load, yield and erosion rates for a drainage basin, and 3) determination of channel hydraulic parameters. The second set of exercises was developed for students who are not able to conduct field monitoring. These may also be used by students who have completed field discharge monitoring. These exercises focus on readily available daily discharge data for several drainage basins in Hawaii, and worked examples include: I) developing annual stream discharge hydrographs for drainage basins of different size, 2) comparing river regimes of local systems to global models, and 3) developing flow-duration curves for different drainage basins. Utilization of real-world discharge data allows students the opportunity to explore relationships and to grasp the underlying controls on discharge variation from drainage basins. These are important aspects in developing an understanding of water and sediment linkages within environmental systems.

Key words: discharge, suspended sediment, channel hydraulics, physical geography, river regime, hydrograph, flow duration curves.

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Knapp, P.A. & Thompson, J.M. (1994) Lessons in Biogeography: Simulating Evolution Using Playing Cards. Journal of Geography, 93(2), pp.96-100.

ABSTRACT:

This exercise links our day-to-day understanding of probabilities with the concepts of evolution as it relates to biogeographic processes. The complex idea of natural selection is presented in a simple, nonthreatening, and fun way. A variety of scenarios can be used to illustrate the effects of evolutionary pressure. The effects of selective pressures along with the consequences of either lethal or strongly positive mutations can be illustrated through a number of generations. Genetic drift can also be shown.

Key words: evolution, biogeography, simulation, mutations, genetic drift, natural selection.

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Masilela, C.O. (1994) Teaching American Students About Urbanization in Developing Countries: The Use of Role-Playing. Journal of Geography, 93(3), pp.114-121.

ABSTRACT:

A common problem facing many American instructors offering courses in Third World urban development issues is the difficulty of finding suitable pedagogical tools which not only capture the stark realities of developing world cities, but also expose the American student to a different planning context and milieu. While a case study approach can provide effective descriptions of the problems and procedures of urban development processes, it cannot cogently replicate the conditions in a developing country, or provide the students with an appreciation of urban development challenges . A role-playing simulation exercise, however, can overcome this constraint and is an effective pedagogical technique that also complements the case study method. This paper describes a role-playing exercise used in an undergraduate course. The administration of the exercise, its success and student reactions from a written evaluation are reported.

Key words: housing, pedagogical techniques, planning, squatter settlements, urbanization.

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Brown, B.J. (1994) Making Connections with Individual Learners in Large Introductory Geography Courses. Journal of Geography, 93(3), pp.132-135.

ABSTRACT:

Although many departments of geography face increasing enrollments in their introductory courses, associated increases in funding to provide expanded student support are often inadequate or unavailable. Ironically, this is occurring while concern about the quality of undergraduate education in the United States is on the increase. Introductory classes usually contain a large contingent of first year students who are often at high risk of failing to adapt and succeed in large courses that provide little ancillary support such as recitation sections or sufficient teaching assistants. Together, these factors create obstacles to maintaining a high quality educational experience in large lecture classes. Under such circumstances the burden falls increasingly on the instructor of introductory geography courses to take every opportunity to make individual connections with learners. Three types of connections can be made. They are: instructor-to-student, student-to-course content, and course content to the world beyond the university.

Keywords: introductory geography, large lecture classes, interpersonal connections, academic connections, applied connections.

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Butler, D.R. (1994) Repeat Photography as a Tool for Emphasizing Movement in Physical Geography. Journal of Geography, 93(3), pp.141-151.

ABSTRACT:

The theme of movement in physical geography is extremely important, but sometimes difficult to convey to students. Repeat photography, through the seasons of a year and across the years, is a simple yet valuable method for portraying movement of physical features on the landscape. This paper briefly describes the technique of repeat photography, and provides several photographic illustrations for incorporating it into the classroom. Suggestions for possible classroom questions that can be posed based on repeat photographs are provided. Keywords: movement, landscape change, physical geography, repeat photography.

The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

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Havill, T., Jobin, R.A., Maguire, B. & Miller, T. (1994) The Y of Geography: Developing a Model World Geography Course for Pre-service Teachers. Journal of Geography, 93(3), pp.164-170.

ABSTRACT:

"World Geography for Teachers" is a unique four-credit college course offered for pre-service elementary and secondary education majors at Keene State College. This article outlines the origins of the course as an outgrowth of activities sponsored by the New Hampshire Geographic Alliance. The course is a model of integrating basic geography content with teaching strategies based on the National Geography Standards. Preservice teachers develop geographic knowledge as they plan and design lessons for future classroom use.

Keywords: teaching strategies, syllabus, geographic alliance, unit box, and teacher evaluation.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
Page created 8th December 1999.
Last updated 11th May 2000.