JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 1996

Pryde, P.R. (1996) 95(1), pp.22-26.
Hickey, J.J. (1996) 95(1), pp.27-31.
Kimmel, J.R. (1996) 95(2), pp.66-72.
Rodrigue, C.M. (1996) 95(2), pp.81-85.
Hertzog, C.J. & Liebe, C. (1996) 95(6), pp.274-280.


Pryde, P.R. (1996) An Interactive U.S. Land Survey Exercise, Journal of Geography, 95(1), pp.22-26.

ABSTRACT

An individualized student assignment is described that acquaints students with the nuances of the U.S. Land Survey (range and township grid) system. In the exercise, students are given a selected section of land identified only by a range, township, and section number description. The students must determine the location of the section, seek out certain basic information concerning the section from topographic maps and other sources, and map the pattern of land parcelization within the section from documents available at local county government offices. The exercise has proven to be popular with students, who generally have little familiarity with legal parcel descriptions or patterns of land subdivision prior to this assignment.

Key words: U.S. Land Survey, student  exercise, land parcelization, townships, assessor's maps.

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Hickey, J.J. (1996) Community College Geography: A Question of Place, Journal of Geography, 95(1), pp.27-31.

ABSTRACT

The claim is made that community college enrollment accounts for one-half of the enrollment in higher education. It would be reasonable to assume, therefore, that a significant amount of geographic instruction, particularly at the introductory level, takes place in community colleges. Despite this fact, community college geography remains in many ways a substantial terra incognita. It is not easy to generalize the relationship of community college geography to the discipline. Community college geography is so varied that discussion of the nature, scope, and standards of community college geography prevents simple generalizations. Understanding geography in community colleges involves the consideration of several questions of place. What is the place of community colleges in the structure of higher education? How has the place of the two-year college become marginal to higher education over recent decades? What kind of a place is a community college to work in? In this paper I will rely on personal observation and a review of the literature in an attempt to focus some of the questions regarding community college geography and its relationship to the discipline.

Key words: community colleges, vocationalization, remediation, transfer.

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Kimmel, J.R. (1996), Using the National Geography Standards and Your Local River to Teach About Environmental Issues Journal of Geography, 95(2), pp.66-72.

ABSTRACT

The six essential elements of the National Geography Standards—"The World in Spatial Terms," "Places and Regions," "Physical Systems," "Human Systems," "Environment and Society," and the "Uses of Geography"—provide a means to organize an integrated approach to environmental learning that is needed if our students are to understand the full range of issues regarding the environment. Your local river offers an exciting real-life arena in which these issues and concepts can be learned.

Key words: National Geography Standards, rivers, leaching environmental issues, river basin, watershed.

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Rodrigue, C.M. (1996), Imaginary Migration Exercise in Multicultural Geography, Journal of Geography, 95(2), pp.81-85.

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a writing assignment designed to educate students about an ethnic or racial group different from their own. The assignment sensitizes them to the historical and geographical experiences, perceptions, values, and viewpoints of an American subculture other than their own. The assignment was designed for a lower division university course in regional geography and should, therefore, prove appropriate for community college and, possibly, high school students as well. Though targeted to a regional course in California, the exercise can easi]y be adapted to a course in any region of North America or to a regional or cultural geography of the United States or Canada.This article first sketches the context in which this exercise developed and the curricular needs it meets. It then describes the exercise itself and briefly presents results obtained from the assignment. In the last section, the article provides source material students can consult to complete the assignment.

Key words: region, multicultural, migration, and ethnic groups.

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Hertzog, C.J. & Lieble, C. (1996), A Study of Two Techniques for Teaching Introductory Geography: Traditional Approach versus Cooperative Learning in the University Classroom. Journal of Geography, 95(6), pp274-280.

ABSTRACT

This study was a collaborative effort between the geography area of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Educational Leadership at Valdosta State University. The proje

ct was conducted to determine whether students in an introductory course would benefit from the use of cooperative learning groups based on their learning styles, hemisphericity, and gender compared to students taught with a traditional lecture/inquiry approach. Students who enrolled in World Regional Geography were separated into a control class, which utilized the traditional lecture/inquiry approach, and an experimental class, which implemented the cooperative learning approach. Both classes began with 40 students and were taught during the mid-morning hours by the same two professors. Although no significant gain was realized at the conclusion of the study, 36 students remained in the experimental class while only 26 students remained in the control class.

Key words: cooperative learning approach, traditional learning, introductory geography, world regional geography.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
Page created 8th December 1999.
Last updated 11th May 2000.