JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 1998

Tuathail,G.O. & McCormack, D. (1998) 97(1), pp.1-11.
Macey, S.M. (1998) 97(1), pp.13-18.
Adams, P.C. (1998) 97(2), pp.47-55.
Lindquist, P.S. & Hammel, D.J. (1998) 97(2), pp.72-82.
Murphy, A.B. (1998) 97(3), pp.132-136.
Chen, X.M. (1998) 97(6), pp.261-268.
Robbins, P. (1998) 97(6), pp.241-252.
Shaw, W. (1998) 97(6), pp.253-260.


Tuathail, G.O. and McCormack, D. (1998), Global Conflicts On-line: Technoliteracy and Developing an Internet-Based Conflict Archive, Journal of Geography, 97(1), pp.1-11.

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we critically reflect upon the place of the Internet as a teaching and learning resource in the educational environment. In order to do this we use our experience teaching a large undergraduate course on the geography of global conflict, into which we integrated a course web-site featuring an archive of conflicts around the globe. We discuss issues that arose from the design and maintenance of this web site and its usefulness as a learning resource. However, going beyond this, we use our experience to offer a number of elements we consider necessary for the development of a theoretically informed critical technoliteracy, something which is required to allow both instructors and students to critically engage with the types of representational power, ideological hype, and human-machine networks that are elements of new informational technology conditioned educational environments.

Key Words: global conflict, Internet, conflict archive, critical technoliteracy, networked educational environments

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Macey, S.M. (1998), Managing a Computer Teaching Laboratory, Journal of Geography, 97(1), pp 3-18.

ABSTRACT

This paper seeks to synthesize key issues that arise in the course of both the short- and long-term operations of a computer teaching laboratory. As background to the facility's management, the first section deals with initial setup issues as they impact future operations. Such considerations include decisions on establishing a single, or multipurpose facility, designing for an open laboratory layout versus a teaching configuration, hidden costs, and utilizing resources to get the most value for your money. The body of the paper examines everyday operational problems. These include setting policies on laboratory access, strategies for dealing with a high student-per machine ratio, and provisions for maintenance, staffing, hardware, software, and data security The final section addresses more long-term management considerations such as avenues for obtaining hardware and software upgrades, networking demands, and generally working around increasing demand with static or limited resources. Potential policies for avoiding problems at each stage are outlined.

Key Words: computer teaching facilities, computing laboratory, practical instruction.The Bednarz Years: Higher Education and the Journal of Geography.

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Adams, P.C. (1998), Teaching and Learning with SimCity 2000, Journal of Geography, 97(2), pp.47-55.

ABSTRACT

This paper introduces SimCity 2000, a popular computer simulation model, as a tool for teaching urban geography concepts. Situated within a more traditional class format, this software can enhance computer literacy, geographical knowledge, and critical skills. The dynamism and visual refinement of the software add to the entertainment value of attempting to effectively guide a city's development. These strengths of the program also facilitate learning about the complex, dynamic, and interrelated nature of urban problems. Students are highly motivated to use the software because of its game-like aspects, yet after using the program they report attitudinal learning in the form of a greater appreciation of the role of urban planners, designers, and policy-makers. Instructors should consider how to accommodate different levels of previous experience with the software, particularly in relation to a gender-based dichotomy that is indicated by this study. In addition, instructors should consider how to respond to the more critical response of students who have a stronger background in geography and urban studies.

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Lindquist, P.S. and Hammel, D.J. (1998), Applying Descriptive Statistics to Teaching the Regional Classification of Climate, Journal of Geography, 97(2), pp.72-82.

ABSTRACT

This article describes an exercise for college undergraduate and high school students which relates descriptive statistics measuring central tendency and dispersion to the regional classification of climate. In the exercise students are assigned a set of mean monthly temperature and precipitation statistics for 65 weather stations throughout the conterminous United States. Mean annual temperature and precipitation and their standard deviations are computed for each weather station. These statistics are used to construct two scatter plots of means and standard deviations for both temperature and precipitation. Clusters of points within each scatter plot are then identified to form climatic categories for temperature and precipitation, which are mapped out into temperature and precipitation regions. These maps are overlayed to produce a composite climatic region map. The open ended nature of the exercise forces students to struggle with the regional classification problem in geography which is not always clearly defined and simple to resolve.

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Murphy, A.B. (1998), Comments - Advanced Placement Geography: Opportunities and Challenges for Geographers, Journal of Geography, 97(3), pp.132-136.

ABSTRACT

These are exciting times for those interested in geography and geographic education. After decades of marginalization, geography is being rediscovered—to use the language of the recently released report of the National Research Council (1997). Readers of this journal are almost certainly aware of the elements of that rediscovery, whether they lie in grassroots demands for expanding geographic literacy, public and private sector concerns over the ability of Americans to function effectively in an increasingly interconnected world, or a new found interest in the role of space and place among those working at the research frontiers of other disciplines. There are many indications of geography's resurgence, but one of the most significant is the College Board's recent decision to add geography to its Advanced Placement (AP) Program. A small cadre of geographers had pushed for this step for some time—most notably former NCGE president James Marran. These pioneers laid the groundwork for a decision that will both capitalize on expanding interest in geography and provide a major boost to the discipline in the years to come. The decision thus represents a significant opportunity for geography—but as with most opportunities, it carries with it challenges as well.

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Chen, X.M. (1998) Integrating GIS Education with Training: A Project Oriented Approach, Journal of Geography, 97(6), pp.261-268.

ABSTRACT:

As more geography departments add geographic information systems (GIS) to their curricula in response to the growing demand of the marketplace, concern has been mounting over the content and methodology of GIS education. No consensus exists on how to make the connection between GIS education and GIS training at the undergraduate level. This article argues that hands-on, project-oriented teaching can offer an ideal approach to integrating GIS education and training. It presents a project-oriented GIS teaching experience as an instructional paradigm that can be used to ensure the balance between conceptual GIS learning and software-based, hands-on training in undergraduate GIS education.

Key Words: undergraduate GIS education and training, hands on active learning, project-oriented teaching, undergraduate research.

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Robbins, P.(1998) Population and Pedagogy: The Geography Classroom after Malthus, Journal of Geography, 97(6), pp.241-252.

ABSTRACT:

While introductory geographic curricula, as evidenced in popular texts, effectively introduce key concepts in population geography, many important issues and current debates are overlooked. This article offers a supplemental set of concepts and issues for use in introductory geography classes that serve to make the classroom more current with trends in academic demography. It suggests that the teaching of population geography would benefit from 1) a reading and discussion of the actual words of Malthus in order to better understand the discourse of Malthusianism in its own time and in our own; 2) a more careful examination of fertility dynamics and behavior, particularly the political and economic aspects of reproductive choice; and 3) a more specific engagement with issues of gender. Finally, the article suggests a classroom exercise to drive home these concepts for students and to more fully engage the teaching of a post-Malthusian geography.

Key Words: population geography, gender, uneven development, pedagogy, Malthus, role-play.

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Shaw, W. (1998) Integrating Geographic Learning and Basic Skills: An In-Class Coopertative Activity, Journal of Geography, 97(6), pp.253-260.

ABSTRACT:

An in-class activity is presented which is designed to improve students' basic math, reading, and reasoning skills while at the same time involving them in the application and understanding of geographic concepts. The activity is appropriate for a freshman-level course in human geography but should also be suitable for use in high schools or community colleges. The activity, which involves applying the concepts of natural increase of population, net migration, physiological and agricultural densities as well as urbanization, is completed by pairs or groups of students working cooperatively. The article begins by discussing the context within which the activity developed, its role in the curriculum, and the teaching challenges faced. It goes on to describe the development of the activity, its implementation in the classroom, the advantages of the cooperative in-class approach, and the learning outcomes obtained. Finally, the activity is provided in a form ready for use in the classroom.

Key Words: population, natural increase, net migration, physiological density, agricultural density, urbanization.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
Page created 8th December 1999.
Last updated 11th May 2000.