JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 1999

Hudack, P.F. (1999) 98(1), pp.23-28.
Eflin, J.C. & Eflin, J.T. (1999) 98(2), pp.67-78.
Hill, A.D. & Solem, M.N. (1999) 98(3), pp.100-107.
Foote, K.E. (1999) 98(3), pp.108-117.
Aitken, S.C. (1999) 98(3), pp.118-127.
Hurley, J., Proctor, J.A. & Ford, R.E. (1999) 98(3), pp.128-140.
Warf, B., Vincent, P. & Purcell, D. (1999) 98(3), pp.141-148.
Ludwig, G.S. (1999) 98(3), pp.149-154.
Crampton, J.W. (1999) 98(4), pp.155-168.
Francek, M.A. (1999) 98(4), pp.169-175.
Sanders, R. (1999) 98(4), pp.169-175.
Dwyer, O.J. (1999) 98(4), pp.176-190.
Thomas, D.S.K., Mitchell, J.T., Scott, M.S. & Cutter, S.L. (1999) 98(5), pp.201-207.
Walcott, S. M. (1999) 98(5), pp.221-228.
Herod, A. (1999) 98(5), pp.229-241.
Nairn, K. (1999) 98(6), pp.272-282.


Hudack, P.F. (1999), Groundwater Field Station for Geoscience Students, Journal of Geography, 98(1), pp.23-28.

ABSTRACT

Many undergraduate geography courses lack field exercises. Applying scientific principles to field problems is paramount to understanding physical phenomena such as groundwater. However, undergraduate physical geography courses do not routinely use groundwater field stations. To facilitate field-based exercises, I implemented a low-cost well field for a hydrogeology course at the University of North Texas. Students use the station to collect and interpret data from wells. 'I'hey study spatial hydraulic head measurements to comprehend groundwater flow, a physical process that operates near the Earth's surface. Hands-on activities help students understand how to construct and use wells. The field module is a valuable addition to the course and is an effective way to meld groundwater theory and practice.

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Eflin, J.C. and Eflin, J.T. (1999), Thinking Critically About Global Environmental Issues, Journal of Geography, 98(2), pp.68-78.

ABSTRACT

Emphasizing global environmental issues in classes presents students with powerful, comparative perspectives on controversial issues. Yet, students cannot make critical judgments without first understanding the structure of critical reasoning. The logic of argument forms used to make critical judgments is a necessary tool that may be conveyed through an interactive classroom activity, drawing on discipline-specific examples that reinforce the content of a course. Two argument forms—convergent reasoning and inference to the best explanation—are described, with instructions for an interactive activity. Examples are drawn from issues of industrial ecology and the human dimensions of global change .

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Hill, A.D. and Solem, M.N. (1999), Geography on the Web: Changing the Learning Paradigm? Journal of Geography, 98(3), pp.100-107.

ABSTRACT

Computer technology has a rich history in geography education. The Internet represents the latest in technological advancements that continue to have important effects on geography curriculum and instruction. Many geographers are involved with Internet-based instruction, which some educators believe has potential to facilitate changes in how we teach and even what we teach. This article describes how the Internet is being used by some geographers for instructional purposes and discusses opportunities for improving teaching and learning with the Internet.

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Foote, K.E. (1999), Building Disciplinary Collaborations on the World Wide Web: Strategies and Barriers, Journal of Geography, 98(3),pp.108-117.

ABSTRACT

Geographers have begun to experiment with using the World Wide Web to cultivate national and international collaborations in instruction and research by creating digital libraries, clearinghouses, academic programs, and instructional materials. Comparisons are drawn among eight major projects now underway to examine what strategies are most successful in promoting intradisciplinary collaboration. All face barriers related to faculty incentives and rewards and to a variety of financial and institutional factors. Strategies that seem best able to overcome those barriers adapt existing models of scholarly collaboration to the Web, as in the creation of digital handbooks and texts, are tightly focused around very specific topics and programs, and strive to build alliances within local or regional university systems or among neighbouring and sister institutions,

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Aitken, S.C. (1999) Scaling the Light Fantastic: Geographies of Scale and the Web. Journal of Geography, 98(3), pp.118-127.

ABSTRACT:

Scale relations are not natural, but exist because they are produced by someone. This article highlights the social construction of scale on the Internet and how some scale relationships are represented in Web-based visual images. I suggest that there are interesting stories behind seemingly simple representations of scale that draw from such things as the complex daily lives of engineers building satellite platforms, scientists reading spectral data, cartographers creating maps, ecologists designating fragile environments, and technicians constructing Web sites. These are spatial stories because they combine to suggest how regions and places are created and who demarcates borders and boundaries. I argue that if the production of scale is the process through which our social world is spatially bound, then it should be possible to develop a visual grammar that enables us to discern the logic behind the boundaries and borders of the Web.

Keywords: scale,geograpical imaginations, social constructions.

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Hurley, J., Proctor, J.A. & Ford, R.E. (1999) Collaborative Enquiry at a Distance: Using the Internet in Geography Education, Journal of Geography, 98(3), pp.128-140.

ABSTRACT:

This article describes how an experimental geography seminar utilized Internet communication tools in conjunction with constructivist strategies to actively engage geographically distant students in the process of collaborative inquiry and comparative analysis. Review of the evidence suggests that the application of constructivist-inspired teaching and learning strategies together with Internet communication tools served to facilitate geographically distant students in a dynamic process of collaborative inquiry and comparative analysis. However, both the application of constructivist-based strategies and the integration of Internet tools require considerable time, effort, and resources that may deter some geography educators from implementing similar Internet based collaborative learning environments.

Key Words: cooperative learning, constructivist pedagogy, distance learning. Internet

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Warf, B., Vincent, P. & Purcell, D. (1999), International Collaborative Learning on the World Wide Web. Journal of Geography, 98(3), pp.141-148.

ABSTRACT:

Although the lnternet has been widely celebrated for its potential to contribute to geographic learning, few have experimented with it as a vehicle for long-distance interactive collaboration. This article reports on an international effort whereby teams of students in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the United States worked solely via the World Wide Web on a joint project critically analyzing electronic representations of the Third World. It summarizes the project's design, problems, and principle results. It concludes that although Web-based interactive learning is feasible and may complement traditional pedagogic formats, it is an imperfect substitute for traditional face to-face interaction that occurs in the classroom.

Key Words: WWW, collaboration, Third World

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Ludwig, G.S. (1999), Virtual Geographic Research Teams: A Case Study, Journal of Geography, 98(3) pp.149-154.

ABSTRACT

As demonstrated in a collaborative virtual geography project, the Internet is a powerful research tool that assists students in accessing information previously unobtainable and from people formerly unapproachable. This article describes a collaborative project in which two classes from geographically distant locations were placed on virtual teams and given a joint assignment that required collaboration, communication, and production of a final project using e-mail, listservs, and a course Web-site. Anecdotal evidence is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the Internet in providing students with alternative information sources.  

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Crampton, J.W. (1999) Integrating the Web and the Geography Curriculum: The Bosnian Virtual Fieldtrip. Journal of Geography, 98(4), pp.155-168.

ABSTRACT:

This article analyses and evaluates how World Wide Web resources (exercises, labs, data browsing and synthesis) can be integrated into the curriculum. The resources consist of an integrated site called The Bosnian Virtual Fieldtrip (BVF), written by two geography department faculty members prior to the semester of use. The target audience of the BVF is diverse, and includes both off-campus and residential students. The site is fairly large but completely modular in order to allow educators to integrate the materials into their own courses. Students navigate and synthesize information (e.g., maps, pictures, glossary) and are challenged to construct meaning via role playing and opinion forming and justification. Outcomes include timeliness and relevance of materials (the Dayton Peace Accords were signed during the semester), a facilitation and exemplification of geographic concepts to students and the public, and incorporation of the World Wide Web into the curriculum. It is concluded that the resources are worth disseminating, but are not an end in themselves.

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Francek, M.A. (1999) Teachers' Notebook: Web-based Exercises in Physical Geography. Journal of Geography, 98(4), pp.191-195.

ABSTRACT:

This article provides over 20 examples of how the World Wide Web can supplement physical geography class instruction. Potential exercises involve such topics as weather, climate, river discharge, earthquakes, and Earth-Sun relationships. A plate tectonics exercise is included as an example of a Web-based activity.

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Sanders,R. (1999) Introducing "White Priviledge" into the Classroom: Lessons from Finding a Way. Journal of Geography, 98(4), pp.169-175.

ABSTRACT:

This article explores the relationship between the values that teachers bring to the classroom and their performance. The insights are drawn from the National Science Foundation-funded Finding A Way project that was undertaken by the National Council for Geographic Education. I argue here that without understanding the values and beliefs of classroom teachers, professional development initiatives might, in the end, make little difference in what goes on in the classroom.

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Dwyer, O.J. (1999) Symposium: Teaching about Race and Racism in Geography: Classroom and Curriculum Perspectives. Journal of Geography, 98(4), pp.176-190.

ABSTRACT:

Introduction Social studies and geography teachers have long recognized the power of first-person narratives for illuminating rich, multifaceted geographies (e.g., Hathaway 1993, Young 1995). Didion's (1983) dangerous encounters in El Salvador, Jackson's (1970) tracing of the stranger's path through the vernacular landscape, and Orwell's sojourns to Wigan Pier (1958) and Catalonia (1952), to name a few, artfully weave the varied strands of place, history, and culture into an evocative whole. Importantly, they elicit unforeseen insights and questions from students by providing them with a nuanced vocabulary for discussing what are often emotionally charged topics. In my own classroom practice, the essays and short stories of James Baldwin, America's literary raconteur of the color line at home and abroad, have become required reading. Baldwin's essays, offered over the course of a 40-year career that ended with his death in 1987, carefully delineate the connections between geography and racism.

l. There is nothing inadvertent about Baldwin's connecting racism and geography: he recognized the power of place. If mapping the ongoing violence of racism is a necessary first step toward dismantling it, as the commentators in this symposium persuasively attest, then Baldwin charts its farthest reaches and depths. Further, his vivid description and lucid analysis engage critical-thinking skills in ways that textbooks, in their Sisyphusian quest to exhaust their subject, simply do not.

2. In the brief remarks that follow, I draw upon several passages from Baldwin to introduce this symposium on teaching about racism.

3. The essays presented here were originally offered during a panel discussion, "Teaching Race and Racism in Geography: Classroom and Curriculum Perspectives," convened at the 1998 Boston meeting of the Association of American Geographers. Varied and wide ranging, they nevertheless cohere around a core of shared themes. First, racism is not inevitable, but is rather a form of oppression to be resisted. Second, racism is at once reflected in and furthered by the geography of everyday life. Third, racist acts are not confined to personal bigotry and violence but include the assumption of whiteness as "normal." Fourth, if our classroom discussions are to progress beyond a mere recounting of personal experiences, if we are, in effect, going to get beyond just getting along, then we must offer our students a rich vocabulary and critical understanding of racism as a social phenomenon. Finally, the causes and effects of racism are most effectively examined across the human geography curriculum, not simply during a special unit or calendar month. The symposium, in sum, offers an extended meditation on how our geographic pedagogy matters in the struggle against racism.

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Thomas, D.S.K., Mitchell, J.T., Scott, M.S. & Cutter, S.L. (1999) Developing a Digital Atlas of Environmental Risks and Hazards. Journal of Geography, 98(5), pp.201-207.

ABSTRACT:

Quality information about the hazards that exist within local communities is often elusive. This article discusses the utility of the South Carolina Atlas of Environmental Risk and Hazards for both classroom instruction and as a resource for the general public. We highlight issues that both contributed to or constrained the creation and development process, introduce the content of the atlas, and conclude with some thoughts on future opportunities to disseminate hazards information within a rapidly growing information technology environment. As a prototype for other states, we encourage others to collect similar data and to create their own atlases using their experience and understanding of local hazards and places.

Key Words: hazards, electronic atlas, educational technology

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Walcott, S. M. (1999) Fieldwork in an Urban Setting: Structuring a Human Geography Learning Exercise. Journal of Geography, 98(5), pp.221-228.

ABSTRACT:

Carefully constructed urban fieldwork enriches students' geographic education in ways impossible to reconstruct in the classroom. Geographic literature lacks good examples from human geography of how this might be accomplished. This research extends fieldwork application to the urban setting at a level most appropriate for college students, particularly those in an urban institution. The research question explored concerns the relationship of a city and its suburbs. Students conducted tests of the suburban dependency theory in five different communities in metropolitan Atlanta, using a variety of data sets, interviews, surveys, and other field techniques. Critical factors previously overlooked were size of the community and the role of county government.

Key Words: fieldwork, suburban dependency, urban geography, human geography

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Herod, A. (1999) Using Industrial Disputes to Teach about Economic Geography. Journal of Geography, 98(5), pp.229-241

ABSTRACT:

In this article I explore some aspects of the 1998 General Motors/United Auto Workers dispute to suggest that industrial disputes such as this can be used productively to teach about economic geography. In particular, the temporal and spatial aspects of the dispute's spread from two plants in Flint, Michigan, to the point where virtually all of General Motors' North American production was shut down can be used to teach about such important geographic concepts as relative location, the spatial scale at which social life is organized, diffusion, and the interconnectedness of places.

Key Words: strikes, unions, General Motors, United Auto Workers

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Nairn, K. (1999) Embodied Fieldwork, Journal of Geography, 98(6), pp.272-282.

ABSTRACT

The residential geography fieldtrip is a key context in which geography students learn how to act and think like geography students/geographers. This learning to act like and think like a geography student/geographer is what I refer to as embodied fieldwork. In this article, I examine one particular aspect of embodied fieldwork: the walking and climbing necessary on two physical geography fieldtrips. The assumption that all geography students (and staff) are able-bodied is one of the many messages conveyed by the selection of rugged outdoor environments for fieldwork. This able-bodied discourse is examined via the axes of physical ability, gender, and age.

Key Words: field trip, physical ability, gender, age, embodied fieldwork

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
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