JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 2000

Taylor, J.S. (2000) 99(1), pp.11-22.
Harrington, J. Jr. & Oliver, J.E. (2000) 99(1), pp.23-31.
Tueth, M.W. & Wikle, T.A. (2000) 99(2), pp.57-66.
Healey, M. & Jenkins, A. (2000) 99(5), pp.185-195.
Fouberg, E.H. (2000) 99(5), pp.196-206.
Solem, M. (2000) 99(5), pp.219-227.
Hardwick, S.W., Bean, L.L., Alexander, K.A. & Shelley, F.M. (2000) 99(6), pp.239-244.
Benhart, J. Jr. (2000) 99(6), pp.245-252.
Barta-Smith, N.A. & Hathaway, J.T. (2000) 99(6), pp.253-265.


Taylor, J.S. (2000) Using the World Wide Web in Undergraduate Geographic Education: Potentials and Pitfalls, Journal of Geography, 99(1), pp.11-22.

ABSTRACT

The World Wide Web is being increasingly utilized in geographic education. Conceptualizations of how the Web should be used in education tend to vary, reflecting a number of different goals. This article discusses the benefits of incorporating the Web into undergraduate geography courses and benefits it may confer on higher education. It highlights potential uses of the Web and discusses claims that Web-based education may lead to a paradigm shift in higher education. A number of questions about the efficacy of Web-based teaching, the desirability of an educational paradigm shift, its cost-effectiveness, and the role of corporations in sponsoring Web-based education are considered. Future prospects for Web-based geographic education are discussed.

Key Words: World Wide Web, multimedia, geographic education.

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Harrington, J. Jr. & Oliver, J.E. (2000) Understanding and Portraying the Global Atmospheric Circulation, Journal of Geography, 99(1), pp.23-31.

ABSTRACT

Atmospheric circulation and resultant surface pressure patterns are important discussion topics in many introductory geography, meteorology, and earth science courses. In the past, summary materials developed to aid in teaching these concepts have used a north-south oriented meridional cross-section of the troposphere (e.g., the three-cell model). We suggest that while the Hadley Cell model works well for the tropics, an alternative depiction incorporating two map views should be used to present a more meaningful view of the mean extratropical circulation. The combination of a tropical cross-section map and an extratropical map will assist students in learning about first-order motions associated with the Earth's atmospheric circulation.

Key Words: extratropical atmospheric circulation, Rossby waves, surface pressure cells.

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Tueth, M.W. & Wikle, T.A. (2000) The Utility and Organization of a College Field Course: Examining National Park Management, Journal of Geography, 99(2), pp.57-66.

ABSTRACT

This article reviews the benefits of field-based instruction, particularly as it complements traditional classroom learning. It suggests that direct observation and hands-on learning associated with field-based instruction raise students' interest level and improve their understanding and long-term retention of targeted concepts. In addition, planning, implementation, and evaluation strategies are provided and recommendations are outlined for instructors interested in organizing or improving a field course at their learning institution. The park management field course offered between spring and summer semesters at Oklahoma State University provides an example of the major components of a successful field course.

Key Words: field course, field-based learning, park management, national park.

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Healey, M. & Jenkins, A. (2000) Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory and Its Application in Geography in Higher Education, Journal of Geography, 99(5), pp.185-195.

ABSTRACT

Kolb's experiential learning theory is one of the best known educational theories in higher education. The theory presents a way of structuring a session for a whole course using a learning cycle. The different stages of the cycle are associated with distinct learning styles. Individuals differ in their preferred learning styles, and recognizing this is the first stage in raising students' awareness of the alternative approaches possible. This article presents some case studies of ways in which the theory can be applied in university geography.

Key Words: learning cycles, learning styles, Kolb's experiential learning theory, learning and teaching, geography in higher education.

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Fouberg, E.H. (2000) Concept Learning through Writing for Learning: Using Journals in an Introductory Geography Course, Journal of Geography, 99(5), pp.196-206.

ABSTRACT

To effectively use journals and other writing for learning tasks as critical thinking and learning tools, geographic educators need to draw from the education literature on concept learning. Using the literature on concept learning and critical thinking, geographic educators can construct different kinds of journal assignments that give students opportunities to personalize and understand concepts. I demonstrate that students, regardless of their sex, level of education, or previous coursework in geography, found journal assignments helpful in understanding human geographic concepts.

Key Words: writing for learning, journal, concept learning, geography in higher education, critical thinking.

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Solem, M. (2000) Differential Adoption of Internet-based Teaching Practices in College Geography, Journal of Geography, 99(5), pp.219-227.

ABSTRACT

Innovation diffusion research has shown that users of innovations have identifiable characteristics that can be used to differentiate them from nonusers. This research classifies practitioners of Internet-based teaching in college geography and relates adoption patterns to faculty members' research specialty, place of employment, teaching experience, and academic rank. All variables except academic rank were related to faculty members' adoption of and approach to Internet-based teaching. The results of the study provide insight into how the Internet is being used to teach geography in higher education.

Key Words: innovation diffusion, Internet, college geography-instruction.

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Hardwick, S.W., Bean, L.L., Alexander, K.A. & Shelley, F.M. (2000) Gender vs. Sex Differences: Factors Affecting Performance in Geographic Education, Journal of Geography, 99(6), pp.238-244.

ABSTRACT

Much has been written about sex differences in learning, but less attention has been paid to the impacts of gender - which is socially constructed - on learning geography. This article investigates whether differences in gender influence performance on a standardized test of geography knowledge. Undergraduate students in two large classes completed a standardized inventory of gender differences and then completed a standardized test of geography knowledge. The results of our analysis of the correlation between gender traits and geographic learning resulted in somewhat unexpected questions for further research on learning styles in geographic education.

Key Words: Gender, geographic learning, assessment, learning styles.

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Benhart, J. Jr. (2000) An Approach to Teaching Applied GIS: Implementation for Local Organizations, Journal of Geography, 99(6), pp.245-252.

ABSTRACT

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a fairly new and evolving curriculum area within geography and other disciplines at colleges and universities in the United States. The challenge of teaching underlying concepts of GIS functionality, the details of computer operation and software interfaces, as well as the contexts of various applications can be a difficult one. At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a teaching strategy - Client-Life Cycle GIS Project Learning - has been introduced in which students in an upper level GIs course work with local organizations, faculty from other university departments, and governmental entities. This allows students with some GIs background to work with real clients; utilize and operationalize the concepts of the GIs Project Life Cycle; make the connection between data development; provide expertise and needed data to local organizations; and see the utility and impact of their work. A group pilot project from the spring semester of 1998 is discussed to illustrate how students responded to this method of teaching GIS.

Key Words: geographic information systems, education, project life cycle, applied projects, local outreach.

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Barta-Smith, N.A. & Hathaway, J.T. (2000) Making Cyberspaces into Cyberplaces, Journal of Geography, 99(6), pp.253-265.

ABSTRACT

This article explores the interplay between geographic concepts and geographers' Web site design. The concepts - place, site, and situation - provide the context for reconsidering current metaphors dominating the rhetoric of cyberspace. Challenging the predominant metaphor of cyberspace as path or highway, we draw on the work of French phenomenologist Merleau-Ponty and on the work of phenomenologically oriented geographers to propose the figure/ground structure of cyberplace in contrast to the void of cyberspace. For the absolute freedom of unlimited space we suggest the depth and breadth of world. If geographers succeed at creating Web sites informed by disciplinary concepts, Web site design itself can help to reconceive geographic concepts. Two virtual field-trips offer the opportunity to demonstrate the interaction of a reconceived notion of place and the design of graphical interfaces. The article discovers possibilities for enhancing the value of geographic Web sites. Three design strategies - geographic context, duration, and nonlinearity - are recommended as a result of this investigation.

Key Words: cyberspace, place, Merleau-Ponty, metaphor, virtual field-trip, Web design.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Claire Reid.
Page updated 2 January 2002.