JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY ABSTRACTS 2001

Brown, D.G. & Olson, J.M. (2001) 100(1), pp.4-13.
Jones, M.C. (2001) 100(1), pp.14-23.
Moseley, W.G. (2001) 100(1), pp.32-45.
Medley, K.E. & Gramlich-Kaufman, L.M. (2001) 100(2), pp.69-77.
Bell, J.E. (2001) 100(2), pp.78-86.
Solem, M.N. (2001) 100(2), pp.87-94.
Dorsey, B. (2001) 100(3), pp.124-132.
Wentz, E.A. & Trapido-Lurie, B. (2001) 100(4), pp.140-144.
Mitchell, B. & Reed, M. (2001) 100(4), pp.145-153.
Bridge, G. (2001) 100(4), pp.154-165.
Nordstrom, K.F. & Jackson, N.L. (2001) 100(5), pp.141-151.
Lloyd, W.J. (2001) 100(5), pp.158-163.
Grossman, L.S. (2001) 100(5), pp.164-173.
Oldakowski, R.K. (2001) 100(6), pp.243-250.


Brown, D.G. & Olson, J.M. (2001) Integrated Teaching of Geographic Information Science and Physical geography Through Digital Terrain Analysis, Journal of Geography, 100(1), pp.4-13.

ABSTRACT

We present an outline of a course in digital terrain analysis that provides students with integrated instruction in geographic information science (GISci) and topics in physical geography and earth science. Integrated teaching of GISci and other sub-fields of geography has value because it presents GISci technologies in the context of their application. Nevertheless, the design of college and university geography courses is often fragmented rather than integrated. Our course provides one potential model for such integration. Assessment of student reaction, using focus groups of both enrolled and non-enrolled students, revealed a generally positive attitude toward the course and pointed out the barriers that prevent some students from taking it.

Key Words: digital terrain analysis.

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Jones, M.C. (2001) A Guide to English-Language Journals for Geography Education, Journal of Geography, 100(1), pp.14-23.

ABSTRACT

This article evaluates English-language journals for geography education in order to familiarize readers with the available journals, most of which are published outside the United States. Nine journals from the United States, Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand plus two international journals are included in this evaluation. Some of the criteria used to assess each journal's content include target audience, type of articles included, typical author for each type of item (nationality, instruction level, and discipline), balance between types of geography, country setting, and scale of analysis. Aspects of journals that stand out strongly are covered in the conclusion. Summary details about each journal are included in a table for purposes of research and subscription.

Key Words: academic journals, geography education, comparison of contents.

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Moseley, W.G. (2001) Computer Assisted Comprehension of Distant Worlds: Understanding Hunger Dynamics in Africa, Journal of Geography, 100(1), pp.32-45.

ABSTRACT

Conveying a sophisticated understanding of rural food systems is difficult, especially when students have little to no first hand experience in rural areas. This article presents the results of a classroom exercise using a computer program known as RiskMap that simulates rural economy and hunger dynamics in different African countries. The content of the software program and how it might be used in the classroom is initially discussed. The paper then addresses two research objectives. 1. Determine if students' understanding of a subject was enhanced when learned through a hands-on, computer simulation exercise (versus learning through discussion and answering questions). 2. Determine student attitudes towards learning via interactive, computer simulation exercises. The exercise revealed a quantifiable improvement in student understanding that could be linked to the computer exercise. The evaluation results also suggest that students were favorable disposed to learning via an interactive, computer exercise in class. The 'realness' of the experience seemed to account for much of this appeal.

Key Words: hunger, food security, Africa, rural economy, computer simulation, food systems.

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Medley, K.E. (2001) A Landscape Guide in Environmental Education, Journal of Geography, 100(2), pp.69-77.

ABSTRACT

The interpretation of landscapes is an important way to learn about geography in environmental education. A Landscape Guide to the Bachelor Reserve applies geographic/historical and biological/ecological perspectives to the interpretation of ten landscape scenes along a three-mile walking tour. For each scene, the guide describes the environmental setting, the composition and structure of the vegetation and the history of human influences. Questionnaire and field assessment document a well-received interpretive tool, and the need to guide participants across land transitions and interpret land use history clearly. Landscape guides can be used in school/community land labs and contribute to holistic learning and multidisciplinary exercises in formal and informal environmental education programs.

Key Words: geographic education, holistic learning, land labs, landscape ecology, nature interpretation.

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Bell, J.E. (2001) Questioning Place While Building a Regional Geography of the Former Soviet Union, Journal of Geography, 100(2), pp.78-86.

ABSTRACT

Regional survey courses are often perceived as ancillary to the systematic foci taught by geography programs. This situation stands in contrast to the recent recovery of place and region as key elements in the practice and theory of geography. In this article, I outline one possible approach for bridging the gap between regional geography's revival in theory and research and its instruction in the classroom. This approach is described in the context of a survey course about the former Soviet Union - a region where the conventional boundaries of place have been severely questioned by political, economic and social upheavals.

Key Words: new regional geography, former Soviet Union.

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Solem, M.N. (2001) A Scoring Guide for Assessing Issues-based Geographic Inquiry on the World Wide Web, Journal of Geography, 100(2), pp.87-94.

ABSTRACT

Inquiry-based learning has a long tradition in geography education, and many faculty members are using inquiry to tap the constructivist potential of the World Wide Web. This paper reports on the development of a scoring guide that assesses the degree to which teaching materials support issues-based geographic inquiry. The scoring guide was tested in a content analysis of geographers' Web-based teaching materials. The results of the preliminary analysis suggest that relatively few geography teaching materials on the Web bear the characteristics of inquiry. Additional research is needed to determine whether teaching materials on the Web are facilitating a shift towards constructivist practice in the discipline.

Key Words: issues-based geographic inquiry, World Wide Web, constructivism, college geography instruction.

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Dorsey, B. (2001) Linking Theories of Service-Learning and Undergraduate Geography Education, Journal of Geography, 100(3), pp.124-132.

ABSTRACT

Service-learning, or community-based experiential learning is receiving much deserved attention as an alternative or addition to the traditional university lecture. This approach to learning not only establishes valid linkages between the university and the community or public sector, but allows course participants to practice responsible citizenship while acquiring practical work experience. The main objective of this article is to establish the theoretical linkages between undergraduate geography education and service-learning. It is argued that community service-based learning is allied with pragmatic and constructivist theories, and may enhance undergraduate geographic education. Second, some of the strategies employed to establish effective university-community partnerships and offer students 'hands-on' experience are introduced. In an upper-division land use planning course, the class first compiled a draft comprehensive plan that was adopted by the planning commission of a recently incorporated municipality, then assisted with plans for open space preservation and environmental protection in the community. A review of the course objectives and the planning project exemplifies the benefits of service-learning and its appropriate application to geography.

Key Words: community service, geographic education, land use planning, pragmatism, service-learning.

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Wentz, E.A. & Trapido-Lurie, B. (2001) Structured College Internships in Geographic Education, Journal of Geography, 100(4), pp.140-144.

ABSTRACT

An internship is academic credit awarded to students for supervised work obtained outside the standard classroom environment. The goal here is to present the format of a structured internship program and the tangible and intangible benefits to students, faculty, and the employing agencies. We define a structured internship as a university program that links classroom activities to the work outside the classroom. Classroom activities can include papers with internship objectives, resume and cover letter writing, journals of daily work tasks and oral presentations of work experience. Students benefit from job-specific skills and career guidance as well as skills that are transferable to other jobs such as communication, office management, and problem solving. Faculty benefit through linkages to the non-academic work community. The employing agencies can complete small tasks, meet people who are possibly future employees, and better anticipate the skills of future employees.

Key Words: college internship, GIS education.

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Mitchell, B. & Reed, M. (2001) Using Information Technologies for Interactive Learning, Journal of Geography, 100(4), pp.145-153.

ABSTRACT

Experiences in designing, offering, and evaluating joint senior undergraduate course assignments in resource and environmental management on two different occasions, which connected students in two universities in British Columbia and Ontario, are documented. The shared assignments provided students with experience in group work and consensual decision making, and allowed them to use a mix of information technologies (e-mail, chat rooms, the Web, video conferencing). The undergraduate students rated very highly the experience with information technology but found some aspects of a collaborative learning approach to be challenging. The course was less successful than had been anticipated in highlighting different regional perceptions and perspectives regarding resource and environmental problems and solutions. Clarification of objectives and expectations, more attention to allocation of time, and consideration of computer access and assistance would improve the effectiveness of the courses.

Key Words: resource and environmental management, collaborative learning, information technologies.

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Bridge, G. (2001) Everyday Ecologies: Cities, Nature, and Teaching Urban Ecology, Journal of Geography, 100(4), pp.154-165.

ABSTRACT

Conventional geographical approaches to the city tend to place the study of urban form and urban space squarely within the political-economic and cultural branches of geography. Geographic pedagogy has tended to assume, therefore, that nature is absent from the city or exists only as a backdrop or stage on which urban economic and cultural activities take place. In contrast, there has been a recent groundswell of interest - originating in places as diverse as environmental activism, environmental history, landscape architecture, and environmental education - in reinterpreting the city as a space intimately connected with nature. This article examines the possibilities for integrating this rethinking of the relationship between city and nature into undergraduate education. Specifically, it outlines the rationale, objectives, and design of a course on urban ecology and examines the benefits and challenges of doing urban ecology as part of geographic education.

Key Words: urban ecology, urban environmental history, natural resources, course design.

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Nordstrom, K.F. & Jackson, N.L. (2001) Using Paintings for Problem-solving and Teaching Physical Geography: Examples from a Course in Coastal Management, Journal of Geography, 100(5), pp.141-151.

ABSTRACT

Use of paintings in undergraduate courses is discussed to show their value in interpreting landscapes from the viewpoint of the physical sciences. Issues of realism and ways to distinguish evocative value from information value are evaluated. Paintings are used to (1) enliven lecture material, (2) test student knowledge and preconceptions, and (3) form the basis of term projects. Paintings reveal historic uses of coastal resources and changing cultural preferences and human values, and they reveal alterations that are of such small scale or local significance that they would be difficult to find in narrative accounts. Student projects evaluate landscape alterations revealed in works by the same artist or the artist's contemporaries or trace differences in alterations through time.

Key Words: art, beaches, dunes, landscape, paintings.

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Lloyd, W.J. (2001) Integrating GIS into the Undergraduate Learning Environment, Journal of Geography, 100(5), pp.158-163.

ABSTRACT

Despite the promise of GIS, substantial barriers have prevented its widespread use in geographic education. Among the key factors are technical impediments stemming from software complexity, pedagogic issues related to the lack of experienced faculty and the short-age of curriculum materials, and systemic issues associated with faculty motivation. This case study describes strategies that were employed for addressing each of these barriers in a large enrollment, multi-section world geography course. Successful implementation of those strategies has enabled large numbers of students in classes taught by instructors with no formal GIS experience to spend a substantial amount of time learning geography with the help of simple, easy-to-use GIS software applications.

Key Words: GIS, geographic education, undergraduate curriculum.

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Grossman, L.S. (2001) The Politically Incorrect Mutual Fund: A Web-based Activity Focusing on Transnationals and the Environment, Journal of Geography, 100(5), pp.164-173.

ABSTRACT

Geographers are challenged to find tools to enhance students' appreciation of the environmental implications of the development process. This paper discusses a novel method of engaging students in the analysis of the environmental impacts of transnational corporations (TNCs) by having them create a 'politically incorrect mutual fund'. The goal is for students to determine whether it is financially rewarding to invest in the stocks of TNCs with poor environmental records in developing countries compared to the returns possible from other types of investments, including socially responsible mutual funds. The project involves intensive student use of the World Wide Web, including creation of their own Web sites.

Key Words: transnational corporations, environment, developing countries, mutual funds, World Wide Web.

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Oldakowski, R.K. (2001) Activities to Develop Spatial Perspective Among Students in Introductory Geography Courses, Journal of Geography, 100(6), pp.243-250.

ABSTRACT

Teaching students to gain a spatial perspective is one of the most difficult yet important components of geographic education. This paper presents a series of activities designed to develop a more comprehensive understanding of spatial concepts among students in introductory geography courses. The activities and content are most appropriate for high school or university undergraduate students. An evaluation of these activities demonstrates that they enhance the student's spatial perspective and their understanding of the role of spatial concepts in geography.

Key Words: spatial perspective, spatial distributions, choropleth maps.

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The GDN would like to thank the Journal of Geography for allowing us to reproduce abstracts from the journal.

Created by Phil Gravestock.
Page updated 18 February 2002.