Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 10 Number 1 1986


Stimulation from Simulation? A teaching model of hillslope hydrology for use on microcomputers

TIM BURT, University of Oxford
DAVE BUTCHER, Huddersfield Polytechnic

ABSTRACT
The design and use of a simple computer model which simulates aspects of hillslope hydrology is described in a teaching context. The model shows how a relatively complex environmental system can be constructed on the basis of simple but realistic theory thus allowing the student to simulate the hydrological response of real hillslopes. Initial runs allow the student to explore how the system operates; at this stage the model can serve as an important adjunct to lectures and field studies. At a more advanced level the model can be used as a means of extending investigations well beyond the possibilities of controlled field experimentation; a large number of simulations can be run in a short time and the results used to define the role of particular variables.

* 1986 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Role of the External Examiner

RICHARD LAWTON, University of Liverpool

ABSTRACT
The unique role of the British external examiner is outlined and its place in moderating standards in first degree college courses discussed. A personal l view is given of the external examiner's current role in geography departments in a range of institutions. Finally consideration is given to the potential role of external examiners in the current debate on standards and comparison of the quality of awards in different institutions and subject areas of higher education.

* 1986 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Teaching Environmental Systems Modelling using Computer Simulation

IAN MOFFATT, University of Stirling

ABSTRACT
A course in computer modelling of environmental systems is presented. By using system dynamics it is possible to teach senior undergraduates how to analyse a system of interest, construct a flow chart of the system, and write computer programs to simulate real world environmental processes. A worked example of this approach to systems modelling is presented along with an evaluation of the course.

* 1986 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Johnstonian Anarchy, Inspectorial Interest and the Undergraduate Education of PGCE Geography Students

JOHN BALE, University of Keele & MICHAEL McPARTLAND, University of Durham

ABSTRACT
This paper reports the results of a survey of geography students in the UK undertaking a postgraduate certification in teaching. The survey indicates that many students in their undergraduate courses had apparently not covered topics with which as school teachers they would presumed to be competent. The implications of these findings for college geography courses and for teacher training are then discussed.

* 1986 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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