Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 11 Number 2 1987


The Tenure Review Process

BRIAVEL HOLCOMB, Rutgers University
JEANNE KAY, University of Utah
PAUL KAY, University of Utah JANICE MONK, University of Arizona

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the tenure review process faced by geographers in American universities from the perspectives of successful and unsuccessful candidates, a department chair, and a member of a tenure review committee. It aims to assist candidates for tenure by commenting on both formal and informal aspects of the process.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Teaching Computing Skills to Geography Students

PHILIP H. REES, University of Leeds

ABSTRACT
The range of computing skills needed by geography students is outlined and the issues involved in teaching such skills are discussed, drawing on the experience of the School of Geography at the University of Leeds. The resources needed are outlined in terms of hardware, software, documentation and teachers. The problems involved in using those resources in an effective way are treated and exemplified by reference to courses taught to geography students at Leeds. An evaluation is made of the degree of success in achieving course objectives.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Teaching Controversy by Seminar: an example in Quaternary geomorphology

DOUG HARWOOD, University of Warwick

ABSTRACT
This paper describes one way in which seminar work can be structured to help students develop skills of critical thinking and expression when discussing controversial issues in their chosen subject. In particular, methods of organising stimulus materials and appropriate roles for the seminar leader are considered. The theory of former glacial 'Lake Harrison' in the English Midlands, which has recently become controversial following research by the British Geological Survey, is used to illustrate the approach.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


A Physical Model for Shallow Groundwater Studies and the Simulation of Land Drain Performance

ROBERT PARKINSON, Seale-Hayne College
IAN REID, Birkbeck College, University of London

ABSTRACT
Pipe drains are installed in farmland throughout the world in order to remove excess water from the soil and promote better growing conditions. Such a widespread modification of nature has inevitable consequences for the hydrological balance and flood response of river catchments. However, the processes associated with agricultural drains and with shallow groundwater are difficult to conceptualise in the classroom. As a result, the 'hydrology' of geography curricula is more often than not 'surface hydrology', with groundwater frequently given no more than cursory treatment. Teaching aids are obviously required. In this paper we describe a two dimensional sand-tank model that illustrates the influence of ground slope on tile drain discharge and the movement of groundwater in general. Using a range of simulated rainfall intensities, a class can be shown that the position of the phreatic divide between two adjacent drains moves upslope in simple linear response to increasing ground-slope. The patterns of water movement may be illustrated by dye-tracing. Since the position of the phreatic divide dictates the size of the drain catchment, it can also be demonstrated that flow towards an upslope drain varies inversely with ground-slope. The model can be constructed with ease. Not only can it be used to demonstrate the effect of topography on sub-surface water movement in agricultural catchments, but it can also be used to illustrate general groundwater recharge processes. As such it is a useful hydrological teaching aid.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Life Experience as a Catalyst for Cross-disciplinary Communication

ANNE BUTTIMER, University of Lund

ABSTRACT
The international dialogue project, based at the University of Lund, has amassed over 100 video-taped interviews with academics in geography and related fields. It offers great potential for teachers wishing to explore the oral history of geography, the role of language and social structures in shaping research, and cultural differences in the development of the subject. An evaluation of the project in teaching students in North America, Ireland and Sweden is presented.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Teaching Spatial Autocorrelation by Simulation

DANIEL A. GRIFFITH, State University of New York at Buffalo

ABSTRACT
A computer simulation game to help teach spatial autocorrelation is presented. Its use assumes that students have a minimal background in introductory statistics and its focus is on efficiently and effectively searching through a sampling distribution, seeking map patterns with particular levels of spatial autocorrelation. The sampling distribution is constructed using randomisation, and the search process is guided by calculations of Geary's contiguity ratio. Experiences with this simulation exercise at SUNY/Buffalo are briefly summarised.

* 1987 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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