Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 17 Number 1 1993


Putting the Environment back into Human Geography: a teaching experience

DAVID SAURI-PUJOL, Autonomous University of Barcelona

ABSTRACT
Since the environment seems to be back on the agenda of human geography it is important to (re)introduce this fundamental topic into human geography courses This paper describes a teaching experience in the Geography Department of the Autonomous University of Barcelona Spain in which a block on environment issues was added to the introductory courses human geography While the experience had satisfactory results it seems more appropriate to integrate the environmental dimension in each of the traditional topics in human geography rather than teaching environmental issues in isolation

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The 'Project'. putting student-controlled, small-group work and transferable skills at the core of a geography course

BRIAN PAUL HINDLE, University of Salford

ABSTRACT
The advantages and problems of project work in geography are outlined. The origins of the large-scale 'Project' at Salford are seen in the need for a new curriculum, and in the University's 'education for capability' objectives, which led to the Project being placed at the philosophical core of the new degree course in 1987. The Project has subsequently been translated into the department's 'Enterprise' scheme. The structure of the Project is outlined, with particular reference to group size and working, student control, task selection, staff input, geographical and professional skills, assessment, and problems. Three tasks are outlined, and student reaction is assessed.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Problems with Fieldwork: a group-based approach towards integrating fieldwork into the undergraduate geography curriculum

MARTIN HAIGH & JOHN R. GOLD, Oxford Brookes University

ABSTRACT
Field study, widely regarded as an essential part of geographical higher education, is under severe pressure due to its high cost, resource demands and a legacy of poor educational practices that have left it on the fringes of the curriculum. This paper outlines a case study of an undergraduate module, framed around a field course, which seeks to integrate fieldwork into the curriculum by combining training in field study with training in research and presentation skills. The module employs group-based project work throughout, with no items assessed individually. The paper concludes by pointing to the pedagogic and tactical advantages of the approach adopted, but warns against the overuse of group work.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


A Low-tech Approach to Teaching Physical Systems

ROB INKPEN, University of Portsmouth

ABSTRACT
Different types of system behaviour can be illustrated using simple and cheap physical models. By using the idea of a landscape of system behaviour the models can be used to illustrate complex concepts in a familiar context. Use of these models is restricted by the need for rapid feedback from students to ensure that the concept rather than the model is the focus of understanding.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Locality-based Studies and the Enterprise Initiative

T. R. SLATER, University of Birmingham

ABSTRACT
Experience in teaching a locality-based studies course for the introduction of 'enterprise' elements into the geography curriculum at the University of Birmingham is reported and evaluated, Locality-based studies courses provide a flexible base for devising and integrating a wide variety of student-centred learning opportunities, including self-directed field excursions, group project work, and employer partnerships.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Planning for Tourism Education and Training in the 1990s. bridging the gap between industry and education

R. A. GOODENOUGH & S. J. PAGE, Christ Church College of Higher Education

ABSTRACT
Geographers have played an important role in developing degree programmes in tourism studies during the 1980s and 1990s. This paper examines trends and developments in education for tourism in the 1990s and considers the development of degree programmes in tourism within a geography department. It highlights potential labour market problems and the need for closer contact between education and industry. The paper argues that education for tourism at degree level needs to be more industry-centred and it reports the results of a questionnaire survey of major tourism employers in Kent and the implications for future course and curriculum development.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Mock Job Interviews and the Teaching of Oral Skills

GORDON WALKER, Staffordshire University

ABSTRACT
In providing an example of how the teaching of oral skills can be integrated into a seminar programme through the format of a mock job interview, a distinction is made between presentational and interrogative oral skills. The former has typically dominated initiatives to improve oral skills training. However, viva voce and job interviews make heavy demands on interrogative skills, suggesting the need to give some experience of such pressurised circumstances within teaching programmes. Running mock job interviews for posts related to the content of particular courses can provide a novel and effective means of integrating skills training with course objectives.

* 1993 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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