Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 22 Number 1 1998


Editorial I
Journal of Geography in Higher Education Goes Online: a new opportunity

JGHE is now available online. The journal's publisher, Carfax, has made the journal available on the Internet using RealPage software via Catchword. In 1998 Carfax is making 40 journals available over the Internet at no extra charge to subscribers. Catchword has developed its own software (RealPage), downloadable free of charge, which allows you to see a perfect representation of the printed version of the journal on your screen and, if you so wish, to print out pages. The software also allows links to be embedded in the journal text so that it is possible to click on hot links, just like a standard Web browser. If this terminology baffles you and you do not want to access the Internet version, do not worry: JGHE will continue to be published in the familiar hardcopy, paper format.

If you would like to see the online version you need to visit the Catchword Web site to download the RealPage software and then to view JGHE. Catchword's site address (URL) is:

http://www.catchword.co.uk/

The site has been mounted on a dozen different Webservers worldwide - depending on where you are accessing from, you may find one of these mirror sites is quicker for you.

Carfax has decided that your subscription to the journal allows you access to both the hardcopy and the online version, but you will need a password to read the online version. If you are reading a copy of JGHE belonging to a library you will need to find out from the librarian the access details for the library's subscription to the journal.

Going online provides us with a considerable opportunity to enhance the content of the journal. Many online journals are either in HTML, the format used for Worldwide Web pages, and therefore look nothing like the hardcopy original, or they are a reproduction of the original hardcopy, often in PDF format, so lose the main advantage of the Internet which is to be able to link documents to other materials or sites. The RealPage software will enable us to include links in the papers to other data, information, files or media. This means that papers submitted to JGHE can now include video or sound clips, computer simulations (for instance, of CAL packages), spreadsheets of data or links to other Internet sites.

As a taster for what can be done, Carfax has agreed to make the issue of JGHE for November 1997 (volume 21, issue 3) available online to anyone free of charge. In that issue the paper by Jeff Warburton and Martin Higgitt discussed IT support for fieldwork. The online version of the paper will include fully operational samples of the packages they have used with students. Also in that issue was a Directions piece on Using the Internet. All the links in that article will be 'live' on the online version and can be used to access the sites listed. In this issue, the papers by Rewi Newnham et al., by Joanna Bullard and by Nicholas Chrisman and Francis Harvey also have hot links to Internet sites mentioned in their papers.

We urge future authors of manuscripts for submission to the journal to think of ways in which you can use Internet technology to enhance your written paper. This need not be a full multimedia production. It may, for example, simply be inclusion of colour versions of figures which, for cost reasons, can only be reproduced in black-and-white in the print version of the journal. However, we can now include items which make use of, or even rely on, Internet technology to illustrate their argument. JGHE will welcome the submission of items which make innovative use of the Internet. It is our intention that the journal should provide good examples of the way in which an international peer-reviewed academic journal can make use of Internet technology to enhance the journal. If you wish to discuss the use of the Internet site, contact a member of the editorial board or one of the commissioning editors: we are keen to see the JGHE Internet site used to its fullest capability so as to enhance the material we publish.

IAN LIVINGSTONE and HUGH MATTHEWS
Joint Editors
Nene College, Northampton, UK

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Extending the Classroom: hypermedia-supported learning

NICHOLAS R. CHRISMAN & FRANCIS J. HARVEY, University of Washington, Seattle, USA

ABSTRACT
Hypermedia materials have great potential in teaching but it is unclear how university geography courses will adapt to the new technology and evolve. We have used a two-pronged approach that places course-specific materials into an integrated hypermedia resource connected to external sources that complement and extend the content. This strategy provides a path for traditional course materials to give access to the enormous resources available on the Worldwide Web. The results of a student survey indicate that the hypermedia materials are a helpful addition for students, especially to support individual learning strategies.

KEYWORDS
Internet, Worldwide Web, hypermedia, multimedia

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


An Evaluation of the Use of Internet Sources as a Basis for Geography Coursework

REWI NEWNHAM, University of Plymouth, UK
ANNE MATHER, University of Plymouth, UK
JOHN GRATTAN, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK
ADRIAN HOLMES, University of Plymouth, UK
ADAM GARDNER, University of Cambridge, UK

ABSTRACT
Use of the Internet is proliferating rapidly, with mounting speculation as to the practical applications for teaching in higher (and other sectors of) education, yet few published or evaluated case studies are available. This paper explores the use of Internet sources on geography courses. For various academic, logistic and philosophical reasons that are discussed, students were not given full access to the Internet, but were exposed to a variety of current Internet-sourced material downloaded onto a network fileserver, and encouraged to communicate internally and externally using electronic mail. This procedure maintained some of the vitality and stimulation of open access to the Internet, whilst providing some control over potential dangers inherent in this untested teaching medium. Evaluations of the student coursework performance on, and perception of; courses involving the Internet indicate no significant impairment in either during the first staging of the course, but substantial improvement in both, relative to similar modules running concurrently, during the second year of operation. We suggest that controlled use of the Internet provides both lecturer and student with practical exposure to this medium with low academic risk and minimal costs, which may lead to enhanced learning.

KEYWORDS
lnternet, natural hazards, coursework.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Feminist Research Methodologies and Student Projects in Geography

PARVATI RAGHURAM, Nottingham Trent University, UK
CLARE MADGE, University of Leicester, UK
TRACEY SKELTON, Nottingham Trent University, UK

ABSTRACT
Although there has been an increasing number of articles on teaching and gender, there has been little discussion of the implications of feminist research methodologies for student projects. This paper aims to overcome this 'blind spot' through discussion of the pedagogic implications raised by the adoption of such methodologies in student projects: choice of topic, choice of research methods, emancipatory role of the project, dilemmas experienced during 'fieldwork' and interpretive and writing styles used during the research process. The constraints mitigating against the adoption of feminist methodologies are explored, including issues of training, supervision, assessment criteria and presentational issues, with the aim of encouraging a discussion on the use of such methodologies in future student research projects.

KEYWORDS
Feminist research methodologies, student projects, institutional and pedagogic implications.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


A Conservative View of Geographical Education

HAIM MARANTZ, Ben Curion University of the Negev, Israel
ANDREW WARREN, University College London, UK

ABSTRACT
The recent debate in JGHE and on GeogNet about skills training and common first-year courses in tertiary geographical education is put in the context of a broader distinction between education and training, a distinction that has been absent from the debate, as it is from recent discussions of school results, and one which is only paid lip-service by the Dearing Report. Education, in brief, is a project which gives students the means of thinking things through in a systematic way. In this respect, it is argued, geography has a secure place in higher education, and has no need of resort to arguments about job-training.

KEYWORDS
Education, geography, Dearing, training.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Arena Symposium: Dearing and Geography

Edited by BRIAN CHALKLEY, University of Plymouth UK

ABSTRACT
From time to time national governments undertake wide-ranging reviews of higher education which can have substantial consequences for institutions disciplines and students. The Dearing Report is the culmination of a major review of this kind recently completed in the UK. It seeks to chart the course for the nation's higher education system across the next 20 years. Interestingly many of the ideas it develops will be familiar to an international audience and are based in part on experience in other countries. The Report contains over 90 recommendations on issues as diverse as student funding curriculum design teaching and learning methods academic standards and links between academia and the world of work. The Dearing Report is an educational landmark event and for this reason JGHE has brought together a collection of papers whose overall aims are to outline and debate Dearing s main recommendations to assess their possible implications for geography and to consider how geographers may wish to respond to the Dearing agenda. Four of these papers were first presented at a conference on Dearing and Geography held in September 1997 at the headquarters in London of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG).

KEYWORDS
Dearing Report, higher education policy

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Employer-Student Workshops: the Aberdeen experience

SUE HEARD & JOHN FARRINGTON, University of Aberdeen, UK

ABSTRACT
A Department-Employer Liaison Group was instituted by the Department of Geography at the University of Aberdeen, with the aim of increasing employer involvement within the Department's curriculum. Subsequent discussion with employers indicated that they did not want to be involved directly with course content, but would be prepared to provide an input into skills development for employment. This view, together with the Department's involvement in the Enterprise in Higher Education initiative, influenced the approach subsequently adopted in annual Employer-Student seminars. The aim of the seminars is to encourage students to reflect upon and develop their skills for employment using the various components of their degree courses. The seminarial workshops provide valuable links between employers and undergraduate students, with some informal feedback to the design of core courses and tutorial programmes through the Department Teaching Committee. The increase in students' confidence, and their recognition of the skills they have to offer employers, is palpable after these events.

KEYWORDS
Employer Liaison Group, Enterprise in Higher Education, seminar.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


How Long is Short?: principles and practice in the delivery of work experience in geography

IFAN D. H. SHEPHERD, Middlesex University, UK

ABSTRACT
Some reflections are made on the principles underlying the design of the short-and-thin model of work experience at Middlesex University. Drawing on five years' experience of delivering this particular model, some of its advantages and disadvantages are identified, from the viewpoint of both students and employers. A number of broader issues are raised concerning the design of work experience and placements, including the credit rating of work-related modules on geography degree programmes, and the duration and periodicity of attendance at the external organisation by the student. It is concluded that many hidden assumptions underlie most curriculum innovations, and that these need to be made more explicit.

KEYWORDS
Work experience, short-and-thin model, module credit rating, module duration.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Increasing Vocational Awareness through an 'Environmental Impacts of Business and Industry' Module

JONATHAN M. HORNER & VINCE GARDINER, Roehampton Institute London, UK

ABSTRACT
The initiative described in this paper is an undergraduate module called Environmental Impacts of Business and Industry. It has been taught at Roehampton Institute London since 1994. Its aims include increasing student awareness of the workplace, developing understanding of how environmental policies interact with working practices and equipping students with skills for investigating and reporting employment-related environmental issues. Students conduct an environmental assessment of a site-specific business or industry and produce a 3000 word case study report which identifies environmental impacts and makes recommendations for improving environmental performance. The paper first describes the departmental/institutional context and the development of the module. It then considers the structure and content of the module and the selection of case studies - illustrating them by reference to some of the lecturing material and work produced by the students.

KEYWORDS
Employer links, environmental impacts, student projects.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Evaluation of the Work-Place Cooperative Project in Geography Degrees at the University of Leeds

JAMES HOGG, University of Leeds, UK

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the context and objective of a Work-Place Cooperative Project (WPCP) established in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds in 1995. The project, in part a response to the changing graduate and employment market in the early 1990s, presents students with issues with a geographical dimension from business, commerce, industry and environmental research. A number of examples from the WPCP are presented.

KEYWORDS
Employment, Enterprise in Higher Education, work-based learning.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Work Experience: who needs it?

IFAN D. H. SHEPHERD, Middlesex University, UK

ABSTRACT
The common linkage made between student work experience and the acquisition of personal transferable skills is challenged. Not only are workplaces biased environments for the acquisition of supposedly generic skills, but other venues (including university campuses) are at least as effective in providing students with such assets. It is noted that the transferability of skills is still largely an untested assumption, that many students do not have the opportunity while working to reflect on their acquisition of skills, and that many mature-aged students do not want to return to work in order to improve their personal skills. It is concluded that most work experience is still largely about work, that our assessment of the skills outcome of such experience leaves a great deal to be desired, and that transferable personal skills can just as effectively be acquired in other contexts.

KEYWORDS
Work experience, personal transferable skills.

* 1998 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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