Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 23 Number 1 1999


Something for Everyone? An evaluation of the use of audio-visual resources in geographical learning in the UK

JOHN H. McKENDRlCK, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
ANNABEL BOWDEN, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

ABSTRACT
This paper reports from a survey of geographers in the UK that canvassed their experiences of using audio-visual resources to support teaching and learning. The survey results suggest that geographical learning has embraced audio-visual resources and that these are, on the whole, being employed effectively. Yet, very little expansion of audio-visual-based learning is anticipated. It is concluded that integration of audiovisual resources into the mainstream curriculum and active learning on the part of students are essential to ensure effective and sustainable deployment of audio-visual technology.

KEYWORDS
Audio-visual resources, fieldwork, resource based learning, television, geographical education.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Student Recruitment and the Geography of Undergraduate Geographers in England and Wales

DAVID CROOT & BRIAN CHALKLEY, University of Plymouth UK

ABSTRACT
The health and success of geography as a higher education discipline depend to a considerable extent on the number and quality of students we can attract. It is surprising therefore how little research has been conducted on the subject of student recruitment. This paper examines aspects of the marketplace for undergraduate geography programmes in England and Wales using data for 1995 1996 and 1997 provided by the Universities and Colleges Admission Service (UCAS). In addition to a national-level review this paper also identifies and discusses the flows of applications and enrolments between regions. The results reveal that applications to read single honours geography degrees fell by 12 per cent between 1995 and 1997. Although geography students remain more mobile than the undergraduate population as a whole geography departments are becoming increasingly dependent on their local region for their supply of students.

KEYWORDS
Geography degrees, student recruitment, applications and enrolments.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Physical Geography at the Transition to Higher Education: the effect of prior learning

JACKY BIRNIE, Cheltenham & Gloucester College of Higher Education, UK

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the prior learning in physical geography of two cohorts of students on entry to a geography degree in the UK. Expectations of prior learning guide degree course planning at level 1, yet many lecturers in higher education are unlikely to have an appreciation of the recent heterogeneity of the geography curriculum for school years 12 and 13 (the old 'sixth form'). A questionnaire survey of 226 students identified differences in comprehension of terminology and in topic coverage between students who had experienced the '16-19' course and students who had followed other syllabuses. However, a familiarity with the subject of physical geography through teaching based on issues was not confined to the '16-19' group, and students who had experienced a purely systematic introduction to physical geography at A level were in a minority. First-year undergraduates have prior learning which is different in nature from that experienced by most of their lecturers. Their knowledge base is reduced and their expectations will be of issues-based learning. The dilemma for first-year degree course planners is how to bring systematic (and transferable) knowledge of physical systems for all students up to a level from which degree level can then be attained without losing the motivation previously provided by the immediacy of issues-based learning.

KEYWORDS
Physical geography, A level, syllabus, course planning, prior learning.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Role-playing Planning Public Inquiries

IAN LIVINGSTONE, University College Northampton, UK

ABSTRACT
In the UK and elsewhere, planning public inquiries are held to allow public debate when there is concern over a land development decision. Using the format of the inquiry provides geography students, usually working in teams, with the opportunity to investigate an environmental issue from a particular point of view and then to present their case as an oral presentation and a written report. Students have to take responsibility for managing the project, collecting supporting information and preparing their presentation. The format therefore allows the delivery of part of a geography curriculum as well as the development of key skills in a non-didactic setting. Experience shows that students greatly enjoy working within this non-standard format, and are highly motivated to produce good performances at the 'inquiry'.

KEYWORDS
Public inquiry, role play, fieldwork, group work, key skills.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Queer(y)ing Capitalism in and out of the Classroom [1]

J. K. GIBSON-GRAHAM, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA & Monash University, Melbourne, Australia [2]

ABSTRACT
Much of our teaching and research in economic geography ends up affirming (or failing to question) the existence of a global, national or local capitalist economy. Using queer theory to open up a space of difference, this paper suggests ways of introducing students to a differentiated economic landscape, offering possibilities outside and beyond the capitalist 'norm'.

KEYWORDS
Queer theory, economic geography, performativity, difference.

[1] - A version of this paper was published in Organisation, 3(4) (1996), pp.555-559 and parts of it appear in the preface to J.K. Gibson-Graham (1996).

[2] - J.K. Gibson-Graham is the pen name of Julie Graham and Katherine Gibson, feminist industrial geographers who teach at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Monash University in Melbourne, respectively.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


'Queerying' Boundaries in the Geography Classroom

GLEN S. ELDER, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA

ABSTRACT
With a view to rethink positionality, social identity, as well as real, imagined, and social boundaries the author draws on some of the contributions of queer theory. It is argued that elements of the debate within queer theory echo concerns in geography about the increasing pen1leability of real and imagined borders. This paper briefly summarises some of the recent debates in queer theory and then reveals how these ideas can inform a geographical imagination. The paper concludes by arguing that the debate about borders in queer theory can be used to inform both geographical knowledge and teaching about geography.

KEYWORDS
Borders, queer theory, pedagogy, identity.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Sexing Geography, Teaching Sexualities [1]

KIM ENGLAND, University of Toronto, Canada

ABSTRACT
I draw on my own experiences as a straight feminist geographer to address questions regarding teaching sexualities in geography. First, I look at 'sexing' and 'queering' geography curricula, not only upper level undergraduate and graduate courses that lend themselves to discussions of sexualities, compulsory heterosexuality, and heterosexism, but also lower level undergraduate courses. Second, a sexual dissident's first self-disclosure to another person typically takes place in college. As such, I discuss strategies that aim to make universities and classrooms less heterosexist and lesbo/homophobic. Finally, I discuss my dilemmas around the disclosure of my sexuality in the context of teaching.

KEYWORDS
Curricula, inclusive language, safe spaces, panoptic gaze, self-disclosure.

[1] - This paper began as a contribution to a panel 'Geographers with sexuality: who and where are we?' organised by Larry Knopp for the AAG meetings in Charlotte, North Carolina in 1996. Ali Grant and Mark Ellis gave me comments on the paper (at very short notice!) and I thank them both.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


'Sex', 'Race' and Multiculturalism: critical consumption and the politics of course evaluations

HEIDI J. NAST, DePaul University, Chicago, USA

ABSTRACT
This paper calls attention to the difficulties of broaching issues of 'race' and 'sex' in the classroom in the context of nation-wide institutional calls for multiculturalism. I argue that critical multicultural objectives can only be successful if: (1) faculty who take curricular and pedagogical risks are able to count on strong support from colleagues, departmental chairs and university administrators; (2) classroom realities of homophobia, sexism and racism are acknowledged at an institutional structural level to he societal in reach and global in scale; (3) we engage in evaluative strategies that are educative about the learning process; and (4) we stress to students the emotional realities and practical skills involved in learning about, and working through, social conflict and difference.

KEYWORDS
'Sex', 'race', multiculturalism, course evaluations.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Out in Academia: the queer politics of one geographer's sexualisation

LAWRENCE KNOPP, University of Minnesota Duluth USA

ABSTRACT
This paper describes and interprets certain personal experiences as an 'out' gay male academic who addresses issues of sexualisation in his work. I discuss several events which have impacted on curricula, on student and collegial relations and on the practices and culture of university settings more broadly. While some of these impacts can be seen as positive (e.g. diversification of curricula, improvements in campus and community 'social climates', critical alliance building) others cannot (e.g. marginalisation, the perpetuation of privilege and backlash). I conclude that sexualisation in academia is inescapably a contradictory process, and that ethical judgements about particular decisions and actions must consider processes as much as outcomes, and context as much as content.

KEYWORDS
Sexualisation, activism, gay, 'out'.

* 1999 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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