Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 24 Number 1 2000


'Nothing Can Ever Be the Case of " Us " and "Them" Again': exploring the politics of difference through border pedagogy and student journal writing

IAN COOK, University of Birmingham, UK

ABSTRACT
Linda McDowell (1994) has called for styles of teaching which put into practice arguments about the 'politics of difference', which has become an increasingly central part of human geographical research. This paper draws on a number of years' experience of teaching an undergraduate course on multicultural historical geography, in which this was attempted. Here students were encouraged to get more involved in these debates, to take them more personally, and to develop 'situated knowledges' about the UK as a multicultural society. The approach to teaching, learning and assessment which made this possible was based on the principles of 'border pedagogy' and on students writing journals throughout the course which charted the development of their understandings of the materials they encountered

KEYWORDS
Border pedagogy, journal writing, politics of difference, transatlantic.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Developing Employment Interview and Interviewing Skills in Small-group Project Work

PAUL HINDLE, University of Salford, UK

ABSTRACT
The value of communications skills in geographical education is briefly discussed. In particular the lack of interview and interviewing practice is noted. The use of realistic interviews as part of small-group project work has been developed at Salford over 10 years. The elements include the drafting of job and person specifications, the writing of a cv and covering letter, and the organisation and running of interview panels. Detail is given of how the whole process is assessed. Negotiation skills are also developed. An important element is the realism of the process. The principal down-side is the amount of staff time involved, but this is more than compensated for by the students' perceived value of the skills developed.

KEYWORDS
Interview skills, interviewing skills, communication skills, project work, small groups.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Jumping Through Hoops?: philosophy and practice expressed in geographers' teaching portfolios

JOANNA E. BULLARD, Loughborough University, UK
MONICA MCLEAN, Keele University, UK

ABSTRACT
In the context of the trend towards the accreditation of university teachers and the use of teaching portfolios as a form of assessment, the teaching portfolios of eight novice university teachers of geography are analysed. The portfolios are examined with reference to: how useful portfolios are for teacher development; what they reveal about philosophies of teaching; what can be learned from portfolios about the experience of novice teachers; and the extent to which discipline-specific material appears. It was found that compiling portfolios can support a self-critical and experimental approach to teaching and encourage reading and the use of pedagogic theory. The paper concludes that portfolios can be useful tools as long as they are embedded within well-thought-out programmes of training.

KEYWORDS
Teaching portfolios, higher education training programmes, philosophies of teaching, mentors.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Equipped for the 21st Century?: audio-visual resource standards and product demands from geography departments in the UK

JOHN H. McKENDRICK, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
ANNABEL BOWDEN, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

ABSTRACT
Mass consumption of image-capture and image-(re)presentation technologies affords opportunities for improved teaching and learning in disciplines which utilise audio-visual data. This paper reports on a survey of geography departments in the UK in which baseline data were collected on the availability, use and opinion on the role of audio visual resources (AVRs) in teaching and learning. AVRs are regarded positively and, on the whole, hardware is readily available. However, the provision of software is uneven and there is considerable variation in the strategic commitment toward, and management of, AVRs. Furthermore, larger departments and those whose research was rated more favourably in the last Research Assessment Exercise were found to be better resourced. There are signs of an emerging resource gap with regard to more specialised AVR equipment. The findings are used to propose audio-visual resource standards and to identify audio-visual products for which there is market demand. There is demand for audio-visual products that support fieldwork activity and it is recommended that further investment is required in digital camcorders and PC-OHP projection units.

KEYWORDS
Audio-visual resources, geography, education, geography departments, Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


'Enlivening' Development Concepts through Workshops: a case study of appropriate technology and soil conservation

SAMANTHA JONES, University College Chichester, UK

ABSTRACT
In comparison with the teaching of most other geography topics, where fieldwork can be conducted relatively easily and seminars can be based on some pre-existing knowledge and first-hand experience of the issues, the range of resources and approaches available to tutors teaching the geography of development is necessarily more limited. Tutors often have to rely more heavily on 'top-down' teaching and more passive learning approaches, such as using videos, slides and lectures. While students may gain a theoretical understanding of development concepts, issues and problems, they may be left without a deeper 'experience' of such material. This paper describes a practical workshop designed to communicate to students the idea of 'appropriate technology'. The workshop enables students to actively 'experience' a development concept rather than simply understand it in theory. It tests comprehension and understanding, through the application of a concept to real examples, stimulates discussion and debate, and draws upon problem-solving and critical thinking skills.

KEYWORDS
Workshops, development geography, appropriate technology, soil and water conservation.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Virtual Geographies and the Use of the Internet for Learning and Teaching Geography in Higher Education

KAREN A. LEMKE & MICHAEL E. RITTER, University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point, USA

ABSTRACT
Despite the plethora of teaching materials that are available on the Internet to enhance geography higher education, few assessments of the effectiveness of these materials exist. This symposium collects papers that provide guidelines for using the Internet effectively for teaching geography. Students must learn how to use the Internet effectively to promote learning; instructors need to learn how to use the Internet effectively to promote good practice in higher education; instructors need to learn how to use the Internet effectively to enhance learning; and higher educators need to learn how to use the Internet effectively not only in traditional classroom settings, but in new, non-traditional settings such as those used for distance learning. These papers provide some assessment of these various aspects of using the Internet for teaching geography in higher education.

KEYWORDS
Internet-enhanced education, assessment, effective teaching and learning strategies.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Cultivating Student Research and Study Skills in Web-based Learning Environments

JENNIFER A. GOETT & KENNETH E. FOOTE, University of Texas at Austin

ABSTRACT
The use of Web-based learning environments involves cultivating new types of study and research skills among students. Students must be able to find authoritative sources efficiently, evaluate the quality of documents thoroughly, and use and cite materials properly. Students may also need guidance in what constitutes appropriate conduct in respect of the Internet and Web. They need to understand the difference between citing a source and plagiarizing it, how to communicate effectively and courteously by email, and how copyright law applies to resources they wish to use. These issues can be addressed in classroom discussion or in exercises woven into online learning materials and assignments.

KEYWORDS
Worldwide Web, Internet, study skills, netiquette.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Addressing the 'Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education' with Internet-enhanced Education

MICHAEL E. RITTER & KAREN A. LEMKE, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, USA

ABSTRACT
This paper evaluates the use of the Internet to enhance learning and to promote good practice in undergraduate education according to Chickering and Gamson's (1991) principles. Results from a survey of 236 geography students over the past 2 years indicate that the Internet can facilitate good educational practices. Students believe use of email encouraged student-faculty contact. Active learning is encouraged, but is not overwhelmingly favoured by students. Prompt feedback is facilitated. Students also believe the Internet materials allow more efficient use of time in and out of the classroom, and enhance their learning.

KEYWORDS
Internet, Worldwide Web, good practice, teaching and learning.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Integrated IT-based Geography Teaching and Learning: a Macquarie University case study

DAVID C. RICH, ANDREW J. PITMAN & MAREE V. GOSPER, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

ABSTRACT
Use of information technology (lT) is increasingly common in geography teaching and learning. This paper outlines a still relatively unusual initiative involving the integrated use of a variety of IT-based components across all aspects of a large course unit. Multiple evaluations reveal strongly positive reactions to the IT-based approach and the time and place flexibility offered; there are few technical impediments to, and no detectable gender differences in, students' use of the system. Most aspects of the integrated approach work well, although it has not yet succeeded in facilitating a genuinely participative online dialogue. Many aspects of the initiative can be transferred cost-effectively to other contexts.

KEYWORDS
Information technology, Internet, Worldwide Web, teaching and learning, evaluation, innovation.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Assessing the Use of Real-time DataStreme Weather Data in an Introductory Physical Geography Course

JAMES A. BREY, University of Wisconsin-Fox Valley, Menasha, USA

ABSTRACT
The online data from the American Meteorological Society's DataStreme course have been used successfully in a traditional undergraduate college weather and climate class. DataStreme was designed to train K-12 teachers to transform weather data into exciting learning experiences. Adaptation of these materials so that some of this excitement could be infused in a traditional college setting was the goal of this pedagogical experiment. These data and associated learning materials have been adapted specifically for use in undergraduate weather and climate courses and are now being made available by AMS as Online Weather Studies. This paper describes and assesses the use of online data. The assessment involved a comparison of student self-reports of factual knowledge mastery, skills acquisition and satisfaction with the methods used in two sections of the same course, one offered with the real-time weather data and one without.

KEYWORDS
Weather briefing, weather and climate lab activities, assessment.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Humanising the Technology Landscape through a Collaborative Pedagogy

SUSAN W. HARDWICK, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, USA

ABSTRACT
A major shift in educational paradigms from a competitive model to a more collaborative model is now under way in higher education. Using collaborative theories espoused by Freire, Bruffee and other scholars working outside the discipline of geography, this paper presents an argument for integrating their collaborative approach into distance education courses at the postgraduate level. The Step Up to Geography Through Distance Learning project is used to provide one innovative model that integrates not only the collaborative method of instruction, but also the use of a multi-layered system of instructional technologies including use of desktop videoconferencing and the Internet.

KEYWORDS
Collaboration, distance education, computer-based learning.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Is Distance Education a Faustian Bargain?

DAVID DIBIASE, The Pennsylvania State University, USA

ABSTRACT
The Internet is a hospitable medium for distance learning. Some geography educators fear that distance education confronts the discipline with a moral dilemma, however. One, in particular, acknowledges some of the advantages of distance learning, but contends that it cannot convey the sense of place that is 'the essence of what it means to be a geographer'. This paper is concerned with the morality of distance learning. In particular, it considers educators' obligations to deliver quality education, and to make it as widely accessible as possible. The paper stresses that the key distinction between distance learning and traditional resident instruction is not the mode of delivery, nor is it the distances in time and space that separate students and teachers. Rather, it is that distance learners are a qualitatively different, older population, with different educational needs from traditional on-campus undergraduates and graduate students. The paper argues that geography educators have a moral obligation to serve lifelong learners, an obligation that should take precedence over our allegiance to conventional notions about what constitutes the essence of our field.

KEYWORDS
Distance education, geography education, GIS education, morality, ethics.

* 2000 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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