Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 25 Number 3 2001


(Dis)spirited Geography?

ROBIN KEARNS, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

ABSTRACT
A recent editorial in JGHE succinctly asked “Is geography history?”. This question encapsulates much of the angst inherent in the discipline as we journey into the new millennium. To a large extent, this angst derives from our institutional contexts rather than our core values, heritage and concerns. For instance, threatened or actual mergers with other academic departments, non-replacement of staff, and stagnant or falling enrolments find many geographers feeling dispirited. This paper explores characteristics of a spirited geography that builds on our publicly recognised passion for primary experience of the world. While we should indeed contest any threat that might consign geography to history, at another level a more spirited geography should become part of history. Pursuit of a more spirited geography challenges us to rewrite global processes into human affairs and be compassionat e towards, yet critical of, technocratic and anthropocentric worldviews.

KEYWORDS
Geography, learning, compassion, ethics, communication.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Female Representation in the Discipline of Geography

SARAH J. BRINEGAR, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia, USA

ABSTRACT
This report updates earlier findings of women’s progress in the discipline of geography from a feminist perspective. A variety of data sources are used in the analysis, including survey data from doctorate-granting US geography departments. Results reveal that there has been progress; however, significant inequity remains in student and faculty representation, particularly in the upper levels of the discipline.

KEYWORDS
Gender, representation, geography, equity.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Using Information Technologies for Collaborative Learning in Geography: a case study from Canada

MAUREEN REED, University of Saskatchewan, Canada
BRUCE MITCHELL, University of Waterloo, Canada

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we share our experiences in designing, offering and evaluating undergraduate assignments that used information technologies to help undergraduate students from different universities collaborate on resource and environmental management problems in Canada. We focus on conditions of collaborative learning and peer review, especially how our uses of information technology reduced or increased the challenges of creating the conditions necessary for collaboration. In particular, we consider our successes and setbacks regarding five challenges: (1) composing effective groups, (2) providing sufficient time, (3) encouraging individual accountability, (4) enhancing regional perspectives, and (5) incorporating peer review and reducing competitiveness.

KEYWORDS
Resource and environmental management, collaborative learning, information technologies, cooperative learning, collaborative learning.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Assessing a Computer-aided Instructional Strategy in a World Geography Course

DAVID RUTHERFORD, Southwest Texas State University, USA
WILLIAM J. LLOYD, California State University, Fullerton, USA

ABSTRACT
An experiment was conducted to compare student achievement under two differing instructional strategies: a small-group and computer-aided strategy versus lecture instruction. Evaluation was extended in several ways beyond comparison of overall student scores. Results show significant improvements in student achievement produced by the computer-aided strategy with reference to gender, ethnicity and levels of cognitive learning. The study concludes that experimental evaluations of CAI serve best as formative tools to match instructional strategies to specific types of content material and different types of students, and that instructional media are best evaluated along with the instructional method in which they are embedded.

KEYWORDS
Geographic education, instructional strategy, technology, computer-aided instruction, world geography.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Linking Research and Teaching: a staff– student interview project

CLAIRE DWYER, University College London, UK

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a project used in the first-year curriculum that requires students to interview a member of staff about their research as a possible model to link research and teaching in the university. Through a critical evaluation, which draws upon responses canvassed from students and staff, the value of the project is assessed and its scope for application within other institutions suggested.

KEYWORDS
Research linkages, philosophy of geography, interviews.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Using Stakeholder Decision-making Simulation to Teach Integrated Coastal Management

STEPHEN FLETCHER, Southampton Institute, UK

ABSTRACT
A simulation technique to teach aspects of stakeholder participation in integrated coastal management is described and evaluated. Through student feedback, it was found that the benefits of the simulation included improved understanding of interdisciplinary coastal issues, greater insight into the challenges facing contemporary coastal managers and an expanded suite of marketable skills. It is concluded that while this type of simulation requires a re-evaluation of the relationship between the lecturer and students, it has the potential to be transplanted successfully into other areas of geographic study that require understanding of participatory governance processes.

KEYWORDS
Integrated coastal management, simulation, consensus, stakeholder participation.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


What Do They Bring With Them? The fieldwork experiences of undergraduates on entry into higher education

ROGER T. DALTON, University of Derby, UK

ABSTRACT
This paper is concerned with the transition from school/college to higher education and discusses the outcomes of surveys of first-year undergraduates enrolled on geography degrees with respect to their experiences of field study as part of GCE Advanced level programmes prior to entry. Despite the core status given to fieldwork in the geographical training offered at Advanced level, the surveys show substantial variation among students in terms of field days, ranging from zero to 11 days. Consequently, each student cohort has a very uneven background of field study. Additionally, although students have developed generally positive attitudes to field study, a number of preferences and prejudices are identified. Many students have clearer recollections of data collection and recording techniques than of the character of the places in which investigations occurred. The resultant implications for field study within undergraduat e programmes are discussed.

KEYWORDS
Fieldwork, school– HE transition, student perception.

* 2001 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

For a copy of the full text article, please connect to
http://www.catchword.co.uk/titles/03098265.htm

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