Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 26 Number 1 2002


Examining Gender and Community Through Critical Pedagogy

ANN M. OBERHAUSER, West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA

ABSTRACT
A growing body of literature in critical geography challenges authoritative approaches to the production (and consumption) of knowledge in higher education. Feminist perspectives have contributed to this literature by emphasising the multiple and often conflicting voices of subjects, including those within the classroom. This paper draws from critical and feminist pedagogy in geography to examine student engagement with gender issues in the community. The case study for this analysis is a project in which students volunteer at community organisations and construct their own knowledges of social and political issues.

KEYWORDS
Feminism, critical geography, service learning.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Some Ideas and Reflections on Teaching 'Ideas' in Geography

KEITH RICHARDS, ELIZABETH WATSON, HARRIET BULKELEY & RICHARD POWELL, University of Cambridge, UK

ABSTRACT
The paper outlines the characteristics of a seminar on realism which forms part of the teaching of 'ideas and methods in geography' in the department concerned. The seminar requires each of about a dozen students to answer a specific question by reading a single paper, writing a summary answer to the question based on this source, and delivering an oral presentation. The questions are structured to deal with abstract theoretical issues at first, and then to consider the implications of these issues for research practice. The experience of the seminar is intended to help students prepare for an open-book examination, and to develop the research planning for their dissertations. Student feedback is reviewed, and ideas for modification of the seminar structure are discussed.

KEYWORDS
Ideas and methods, seminar, realism.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Internationalisation of the Curriculum: designing inclusive education for a small world

MARTIN J. HAIGH, Oxford Brookes University, UK

ABSTRACT
Responding to the globalisation of commerce and communication and driven by competition in the multi-billion dollar international market for higher education, many universities are seeking to market their educational provision internationally. Feedback from some disappointed 'customers' has created pressure for change in the way that instruction is designed and delivered. This pressure is beginning to affect teachers in subjects perceived as international in perspective. This paper reviews the strategies suggested by Western universities to achieve internationalisation of the curriculum. Internationalisation is a major project that affects all aspects of a university's provision, including its priorities for staff development and career rewards. The challenge for course developers is to design a curriculum that serves global rather than national priorities, which does not rely on prior knowledge of local provenance, where students from all sources share equal opportunities for advancement in an inclusive learning environment, and which serves to introduce stay-at-home students to the demands of an increasingly multinational world of work.

KEYWORDS
Internationalisation, multicultural, inclusive education, curriculum change, teaching strategies.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


A Self-learning Multimedia Approach for Enriching GIS Education

A. ZERGER, The University of Melbourne, Australia
I.D. BISHOP, The University of Melbourne, Australia
F. ESCOBAR, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
G.J. HUNTER, The University of Melbourne, Australia

ABSTRACT
Geographic information systems (GIS) are a rapidly evolving technology that has recently been integrated into undergraduate and postgraduate learning. GIS is also a multidisciplinary technology that has important relevance beyond its traditional disciplinary homes. This paper describes an initiative developed by the Department of Geomatics at the University of Melbourne, Australia, to create multimedia-based self-learning modules for teaching GIS to undergraduate and postgraduate students. The modules are designed to complement rather than replace existing approaches to learning such as formal lectures, practical laboratory assignments and major project requirements. The learning modules have been developed using Macromedia Director and are delivered interactively via the Internet. This paper examines the pedagogical issues of learning that accompany technological advancement and practical issues of module development. It discusses results from preliminary student evaluations and examines the broader learning opportunities associated with flexible delivery mechanisms such as the Internet. Further details and access to all modules are available at http://www.geom.unimelb.edu.au/gisweb/.

KEYWORDS
GIS, multimedia, self-paced learning, Internet.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Developing and Embedding Reflective Portfolios in Geography

PAULINE KNEALE, University College Leeds, UK

ABSTRACT
The School of Geography at the University of Leeds, UK, led the development of a faculty-wide Personal Reflective Portfolio as part of a university project - A Strategic Model for Developing Methods and Materials for Recording Achievement in Traditional Universities (Jackson et al., 2000). This paper describes the materials and their usage, the value of bottom-up design, and the issues of embedding this type of material within faculty programmes. The reflections of both students and tutors are considered. Overall the materials are viewed positively and considered to have long-term and workplace relevance. Whether they meet the original aim of helping students to become more reflective and evaluative learners is impossible to measure and not thought to be successful as yet. Reflection on action is more evident than action planning.

KEYWORDS
Reflection skills, personal development portfolios, recording achievement, personal development planning.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Photography as Geographical Fieldwork

JAMES D. SIDAWAY, National University of Singapore

ABSTRACT
Photography has a long history in geographical fieldwork. This paper reports on a student project that recovers this history and uses photography and commentary to represent the city of Barcelona. The place of the project within the broader (second-year undergraduate) fieldcourse and curriculum is described. The paper concludes with considerations of the way that photography lends itself to raise issues of representation evident in contemporary human geography. Since it is accessible to students, and offers practical examples, photography is a good way to approach and introduce more complex questions of method, epistemology and representation.

KEYWORDS
Fieldwork, photography, representation, Barcelona.

* 2002 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

For a copy of the full text article, please connect to
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