Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Volume 8 Number 1 1984


Geography in Area Studies: have British geographers missed the boat?

JOHN COYNE, Dorset Institute of Higher Education

ABSTRACT
The intensive study of major regions in geography has declined in importance. Multi-disciplinary area studies courses have developed in UK higher education. In some, geography has played a major part; in others it is insignificant or absent. Geographers can become more involved in area studies courses where opportunities exist for extending and enriching scholarship, especially in the humanist tradition, to the benefit both of geography and area studies.

* 1984 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


First Year on the Faculty: being there

L. DEE FINK, University of Oklahoma at Norman

ABSTRACT
Approximately 100 geographers were studied as they made the transition from graduate student to full-time academic appointments. Information is presented about six factors that significantly affected both their performance and their professional satisfaction. Recommendations are made for graduate students applying for academic positions, for new faculty members and for departments receiving new faculty members.

* 1984 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Break up Your Lectures: or Christaller sliced up

GRAHAM GIBBS & ALAN JENKINS, Oxford Polytechnic

ABSTRACT
Expounding for an hour is, we argue, a relatively poor way of teaching a large group during a 'lecture' period. Problems with such conventional lectures are discussed and a method outlined which overcomes some of these problems. In this method, which we shall call structured lectures, the lecture period is divided up into segments. Only some of these segments involve the lecturer talking. In others students discuss topics or complete exercises set by the teacher. An example of such a lecture on aspects of Christaller's central place theory is described both to indicate how to use structured lectures and to discuss the issues that teachers have to confront to adopt this strategy successfully.

* 1984 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


Departmental Relationships and Images Within the University

SIDNEY R. JUMPER, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

ABSTRACT
It is contended that the foremost condition for the survival and ultimate success of departments is the development of qualitatively superior images and relationships within the university, and that excellence at that level must normally precede or accompany significant recognition at regional, national, and international scales. Aggressive participation by geographers is advocated in matters involving relationships with other disciplines, the university decision-making process, concerns of students, alumni and developmental activities, and creation of a superior curriculum. A series of operational principles, called 'bewares', is suggested to guide the internal management of departments that seek excellence at any level.

* 1984 Index

*Journal of Geography in Higher Education Cumulative Index


The Geography Discipline Network would also like to thank Taylor & Francis Ltd for permission to reproduce abstracts from the Journal of Geography in Higher Education

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